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  • #22217
    Avatar of Kevin Bales
    Kevin Bales
    Participant

    I forgot we can’t post pics here.

    Google image search “ocean gyre” , and “Solar furnace” if needed

    #22215
    Avatar of Kevin Bales
    Kevin Bales
    Participant

    Thank you spark.

    I know it happens occasionally; a chunk of rock with enough air in it to float drifts around the ocean until it gets waterlogged. Somewhere, in another thread, there was talk about simply water proofing one as-is and moving in. I like your idea better. If you put the processing equipment on the rock itself you could work from it until you had enough artificial land to move onto.

    As far as legal ownership I doubt you would get much of a fight from anyone. Most established nations have rocks. and all you have to do is tie it up in court for months (not hard to do) and work fast.

     

     

    #21601
    Avatar of Kevin Bales
    Kevin Bales
    Participant

    Interesting from an engineering point of view and impressive but what useful application is there for us?

    Roving harvester? plastic from the surface of the gyres, minerals, artifacts, whatever from the ocean floor?

    Of course Jansen uses purely mechanical components for artistic reasons. If we used  simple computer instead of the mechanical counter he does for navigation we could get  machine capable of deciding wht was “interesting” enough to collect.

    Anything that powers itself like this is worth looking into.

     

     

    #21477
    Avatar of Kevin Bales
    Kevin Bales
    Participant

    I like this.

    Elmer has convinced me of the usefulness of concrete and the foam core offer more confidence than simple an empty space.

     

    Possible variation?

    cover your foam with metal screen or a conductive coating and let seacrete cover it. The trickle of electricity you need to get it to accumulate is small and could be provided by PV cells or a wind turbine.

     

    If you were set up in an ocean gyre you could get a lot of your styro (and other plastics of course) by salvaging them.

    Between that and the seacrete you are getting a lot of your raw materials cheap.

     

     

    #21436
    Avatar of Kevin Bales
    Kevin Bales
    Participant

    I’ll play

     

    Soft-serve ice cream

    Drive in theatre

    Bumper cars

    Holodeck

     

    #21429
    Avatar of Kevin Bales
    Kevin Bales
    Participant

    Bamboo; The normal lifespan in salt water is about two years but some coating that lasts much longer and is very cheap would allow even very impoverished peoples to seastead.

    Like a lot of conversations around here I suggest this thread is leading us to the fact that hybrid, multiple solutions are best.

    #21428
    Avatar of Kevin Bales
    Kevin Bales
    Participant

    Sparky,

    Interesting. For a small craft a small saltwater marsh garden that could be hauled aboard when underway would be nice. Interesting and decorative even before it was productive.

     

    elspru,

    Of course seaweed and fish is our bread and butter but copepod butter on kelp sandwiches would get old sooner or later.

    One thought was that the dietary requirements of humans may favor a terrestrial diet and another is that many people on the seastead might be tourists and that offering some traditional foods besides seafood would be almost necessary.

    Keeping a healthy cow would consume as much resources as a small family. Marine mammals are smart, cute and popular. It would be bad politics to slice them up for the buffet.

    Another reason to drag around a mangrove swamp is that a forest on a boat would look very impressive (again I’m thinking of tourists) and, taking advantage of extant halophilic ecosystems would probably make it pretty easy. The fishing cats and monkeys would be a real crowd pleaser. Making the floating garden modular would allow us to separate species that wouldn’t necessarily get along well.

     

    There is a salt marsh wallaby but that’snot what I was hoping for.

    Oh well, look like steaks have to be flown in.

     

    #21404
    Avatar of Kevin Bales
    Kevin Bales
    Participant

    Spark, thanks for this research.

    Now, some questions you may be able to answer.

    What is the optimum distance between cathode and anode?

    Do you know a quick & sloppy way to estimate how much current would be needed for a given size structure? (I assume surface area is the main factor)

    I know seacrete/biorock that grows more slowly is denser and stronger. Consider a framework of rebar or steel pipe that I want to cover with a dense, slowly grown layer before I speed things up. What voltage/amperage do I want for each phase of that growth?

    I realize these may be questions that nobody knows answers to yet.

    Again, thanks for your work.

     

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