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  • #16904
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    joffemd
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    I would say probably not – although I am very concerned with this issue.

    These initial projects need to be really incremental. Each seasteading or land-based sovereignty project has a very low chance of success.

    We won’t break through into the mainstream unless we can have a couple of successes. Thus, we have to start modestly. We need to solve widely acknowledged problems without creating too much opposition.

    #16901
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    joffemd
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    JL: Thanks for creating the skeleton on the wiki.

    Alan: Thanks for pointing out the earlier thread you started.

    At yesterday’s Seasteading Meetup, we agreed to create a small group to further develop this concept. The goal is to have a well defined business plan in time for the June 1st Seasteading Conference in San Francisco. I hope we can effectively engage people who are not physically located inour area. I don’t think the forum is ideal for this purpose, but the wiki should be at least part of the solution.

    With respect to some of the discussion on Alan’s thread:

    (1) I think presribing and administering medications is an important part of the picture. Many drugs are much cheaper in Mexico than in the US due to restrictions on reimportation and patent laws. We need to take advantage of the arbitrage opportunites this sitiuation creates.

    (2) On the other hand, we need to avoid drugs that are subject to substantial federal enforcement actions. Thus, medical marijuana is clearly not an option for us. There is just too much risk that the Drug Enforcement Administration will come up with some pretext to shut us down. I don’t have a strong opinion about morphine, oxycontin, etc. In each case, we have to make a business decision: how much incremental revenue can we realize from offering these and how many extra patients will they attract versus how much risk do they add.

    I think the sweet spot is offering a range of physician services to people who lack insurance coverage or who will have insufficient coverage after Obamacare passes. Hospice may also be an attractive alternative, but I am not sure that we would have a cost advantage on nurse-oriented care, whereas we clearly can leverage savings from the use of foreign doctors.

    #16647
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    joffemd
    Participant

    I look forward to seeing what you come up with. Might be good to put it on GoogleDocs or a new project management platform TSI is in the process of introducing, so that we could collaborate.

    I just spoke to a US physician who had two interesting comments:

    (1) Physicians from foreign countries that have less sophisticated medical technology (perhaps like Cuba), may have more difficulty satisfying American patients. If they are not good at reading MRIs and other images, patients may be displeased.

    (2) It may be possible to attract US physicians to a medstead located near the US. Many physicians are frustrated by the amount of regulation and paperwork government has imposed on their practices. The concern would be one of whether their work on the MedStead would be cause for loss of their state license.

    Marc

    #16580
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    joffemd
    Participant

    JL: If there’s a supply of qualified doctors in the US, it would be possble to scale up: multiple Seasteads located near large coastal cities.

    I am surprised to hear that a lot of Latin American born doctors in the US are having trouble finding work. How do we connect with these folks?

    Shredder: Thanks for the design, however, I would be biased toward finding a used navy ship. The business concept itself has a lot of risks; I would be reluctant to layer new technology on top of that.

    #16528
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    joffemd
    Participant

    How do current medical tourists circumvent travel restrictions that prevent US citizens from visiting mainland Cuba?

    Actually, this restriction is the economic basis for the Seastead. The US law prohibits Americans from spending money in Cuba. There is no prohibition against visiting a Cuban doctor on a vessel.

    During hurricane season, would there be any legal issues in mooring the vessel in a Cuban port? How about a Florida port?

    I think Florida would be the best option. I am not aware of any legal issues in that case.

    If the vessel were to pass through the Panama Canal to calmer waters each year, which country do you think would make a good alternate host for medical services?

    Costa Rica is another good medical tourism center.

    Have you priced any vessels yet? I have sent you a message.

    No, and sorry for the delay in responding…

    #16344
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    joffemd
    Participant

    Thanks for your interest.

    Cuba has a substantial tourism industry operated largely by for-profit foreign coporations. So, I think it would be fair to say that the regime is willing to use the marketplace when foreigners and their money are involved.

    Cuba also has a medical tourism industry. See, for example, http://www.futureyears.com/health/medical-tourism/cuba/

    It may not be necessary to reach Raul Castro directly. I think the first approach would be to operators of medical tourism facilities in Cuba – who undoubtedly have relationships within the bureaucracy.

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