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  • #10428
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    bencoder
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    tusavision wrote:

    wikipedia: “electrodynamic_tether”

    I’ve been looking for this link for ages. I’m not sure if an air ship is high altitude enough for such a thing though.

    I’d say electrodynamic tether is probably the wrong way to go, that works best if you’re out in space and orbiting but it would be better to capture atmospheric electricity. There is in fact a huge voltage gradient when you go from low altitude to high altitude.. it’s what causes lightning, and although it’s difficult, due to the extremely low current, it is possible to capture that energy and it has been done.. i think there was a post on this forum a while back that mentioned it, but I can’t find any links to the experiments right now.

    #10270
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    bencoder
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    i_is_j_smith wrote:
    Shouldn’t we spend time deciding which of the three is the best approach and then sink all available resources into making that approach a reality?

    Certainly, that would be the best solution /if/ we can guarantee that solution X is the best, but to determine what is the best generally requires trial and error, determing which of the alternatives is best.

    Or, in other words: If you’re wrong and you’ve sunk all available resources into that wrong idea then you are finished. If you have several vectors, even if they are less well formed at the time you determine one of them won’t work, then you still have the opportunity to succeed.

    I suppose it’s the age old risk vs reward. Lower risk lower reward, higher risk higher reward, Choose your path. The high risk, all eggs in one basket method works sometimes, but for all those for whom it has worked, many others failed trying the same method.

    Perhaps something as revolutionary and high risk as seasteading needs a high risk start, but from my point of view, I prefer a multi-pronged more organic approach.

    #10228
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    bencoder
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    What an insightful first post, pretty much summing up my feelings and thoughts on the world today and seasteading, but put together far more eloquently than I am capable of. I’m saving (what’s left of my money after the mob gets their cut) for a sail boat at the moment since unfortunately I don’t see the large scale seasteading discussed here coming together any time soon (although I am very hopeful that I would be proven wrong).

    Anyway, welcome to the forum, good to have you here.

    #9625
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    bencoder
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    Just to remind people that this channel still exists.

    Me and Aeolius idle there pretty much 24/7, and it would be good to have a few more people come and join in.

    Aeolius has suggested we maybe try and make a weekly chat so that hopefully we can bring people together at the same time a bit more easily.

    #9579
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    bencoder
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    Can I ask how you are planning on getting to the site? I’m also in the UK and looking at the feasability of getting to ephemerisle this year, but I am on a limited budget and can’t see any low cost way to get from SFO(is that the closest/easiest) to the site.

    #9064
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    bencoder
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    It would be stable to a very small extent but it is ultimately very unstable. let me try to explain.

    In it’s upright configuration it will act like this:

    1

    So you have the two floats counteracting the downwards force from the mass of the ‘stead. This is fine.

    Now let us tilt the seastead a little bit (as would happen):

    hooch 2

    Due to the slack that would be introduced on the left hand side, the left hand side would experience no buoyancy, This leads to a metastable state… since the right hand side has all the buoyancy, we have a stabilising force, the upwards buoyancy on the right with the downwards force from gravity act together to rotate the ‘stead back into the upright position.

    However, if we tilt the stead just a little bit more:

    hooch 3

    We can now see that we have the opposite effect, the upwards force from the buoyancy of the float is to the left of the downwards force from gravity. this acts together to rotate the stead to the right, toppling it straight away.

    So basically your design would only be able to experience a very small amount of tilt before toppling itself straight over, upside down.

    #8959
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    bencoder
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    greyraven_r wrote:
    Wouldn’t it be nice to have a Sea Stead Confederation Constitution as part of the concept in general?

    No, it’s pretty much the antitheses to the point of the seasteading institute. TSI don’t support or encourage any particular set of rules (though it’s members might, and do). There’s nothing wrong with us lot as a group coming up with a constitution we all agree on but it must be separate from TSI as an entity.

    #8908
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    bencoder
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    Eelco wrote:

    So you might start with fairly small sections near land, and once a critical number of them are built, they might be assembled into a structure large enough to do well out in international waters.

    In fact, IIRC, the barge Wil mentioned was built pretty much like that. OK, the individual parts of it weren’t floating out in the sea with people on them, but it was built in modular sections in different countries and then the sections were tugged to the same place and combined to form the whole.

    #8877
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    bencoder
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    well, in this world now you can pretty much pollute as much as you want as long as it’s not CO2 (which is at worst, the least harmful thing produced as waste by industry, and at best, the giver of life)

    Nick: I’d say that if you care about these things then it is your business whether others are polluting, because you need to know whether or not you want to take your business to that company.

    #8774
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    bencoder
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    Yep. I’m here. Living near to Portsmouth.

    Ben

    #8605
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    bencoder
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    Really good to see you here again PJ :)

    #8372
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    bencoder
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    i_is_j_smith wrote:

    more obtrusive than most of the current world’s developed states

    Hmm, I don’t think so…of course I’m biased cause it’s my system. Strange. What part of all this do you feel is obtrusive?

    OK, I was probably exagerating a little when I said it’s worse than most developed states. I suppose I oppose the whole idea of state run banking and defence, although that’s not exactly worse than the existing states. But at least current state banks don’t expect me to give my DNA every time I want to get some money out and most states don’t store the DNA of all its citizens, and even visitors(not sure about the US, but i think they do fingerprints for all visitors now)

    I’d much rather have privately owned cameras that can be used to find out the criminal after the fact, rather than have the assumption of guilt taken just by being on your seastead.

    #8370
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    bencoder
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    Jeff wrote:

    That’s why boats and ships have tons of ballast in their keels (at the deepest point underwater): to move the center of gravity below the center of buoyancy in order to create stability.

    In the interests of accuracy, that’s not entirely true. Many boats don’t have a center of gravity below the center of buoyancy, but in fact they are “meta-stable” because as the boat shifts in the water, the center of buoyancy moves, as a different part of the ship is underwater, which makes the center of buoyancy laterally move away from the center of gravity and oppose the tilt. The simplest example of this is the catamaran, where, in the extreme case, if one hull is fully underwater and the other fully out of water, then the center of buoyancy will be located in the underwater hull, lifting that side only and stabilising the boat. This is true of most monohull boats as well, but catamarans are simpler to visualise in this case. That does mean that there is a certain angle where these metastable boats cannot recover from.

    I imagine that the design shown would be pretty meta-stable because of the wideness of it, although i’d change the design so that the buoyancy is more at the edges and less in the middle. As the seastead tilts, more of the seastead on the tilted down side is underwater, opposing the tilt.

    #8367
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    bencoder
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    Carl wrote:

    i_is_j_smith wrote:

    Of course you aren’t required to do it. You don’t want to show that clerk your passport, don’t enter the country.

    [/quote]

    Yep. This is The Seasteading Institute after all, not The Seastead. I’ll vote with my feet(or boat, more likely) and say that I am not going to submit myself to Smith’s state, which sounds more obtrusive than most of the current world’s developed states.

    #8343
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    bencoder
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    i_is_j_smith wrote:

    I’m more interested in using biometric systems for all ID checks like when you withdraw gold from the bank, or try to join the defense forces, etc.

    Can you not let the bank owners decide how to check for ID? And the defence company? then people are free to choose

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 53 total)