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  • #16916
    Avatar of Lasse-Birk-Olesen
    Lasse-Birk-Olesen
    Participant

    i_is_j_smith and OCEANOPOLIS, thanks! That’s useful information.

    #16882
    Avatar of Lasse-Birk-Olesen
    Lasse-Birk-Olesen
    Participant

    Hi! I’ll be at Blueseed for a couple of months, assisting with some preliminary research.

    Currently I’m looking for information on the seabed condition in preparation for determining suitable mooring/anchoring solutions. The obvious way to do this is to send out a team to investigate the seabed, but perhaps someone here would know of a less expensive solution which we can use until a higher degree of detail is needed.

    Perhaps there is an organisation with experience in anchoring/mooring off the Californian coast, or there is a database with seabed conditions in various locations.

    Let me know if you have suggestions.

    #11176
    Avatar of Lasse-Birk-Olesen
    Lasse-Birk-Olesen
    Participant

    Check out http://www.openstreetmap.org/ – it has territorial water borders for most countries.

    #8867
    Avatar of Lasse-Birk-Olesen
    Lasse-Birk-Olesen
    Participant

    This is great, congratulations on your business!

    OCEANOPOLIS wrote:

    Numbers are based on 120’ of total dockage

    Well, MMK is small.

    It seems it would be fairly easy to increase dockage space by building floating piers? Just standard rafts connected by their ends.

    #8775
    Avatar of Lasse-Birk-Olesen
    Lasse-Birk-Olesen
    Participant

    Should give you an idea: http://seasteading.org/profile/profile_country/UK

    Also, you may be interested in joining the Baltic Seasteading mailing list: http://balticseasteading.com

    #8723
    Avatar of Lasse-Birk-Olesen
    Lasse-Birk-Olesen
    Participant

    xnsdvd wrote:

    I forgot to point out the only thing stopping me from anchoring a platform 200NM outside someone else’s EEZ is the fact that there is currently no technology that will allow us to anchor in water that deep.

    Population is the other issue. Including myself, there are a grand total of 3 other people I know personally that are willing to pack up and leave.

    Have you considered anchoring in the contiguous zone? You will benefit from most of the freedoms of the true international waters, but being only 12 nm from the coast, shallower waters will make it easier to anchor. Also, a reasonably fast motorboat will be able to take you to land in 30 minutes, so even though you’re only 3 people you won’t be any more isolated than a lot of people living in rural areas today are. (This is what I will start experimenting with next year in the Baltic. If I remember correctly, 12 nm from the Danish coast it is only about 15-25 meters deep in the Baltic.)

    EDIT: I am aware that you’re not allowed to anchor permanently in the contiguous zone, but in shallow waters it will be no problem to pull up the anchor and change the position once in a while.

    #8691
    Avatar of Lasse-Birk-Olesen
    Lasse-Birk-Olesen
    Participant

    I encourage anyone interested in establishing a seastead community in the Baltic Sea to sign up for the mailing list at http://www.balticseasteading.com

    The waves in the Baltic are no higher than it may be perfectly safe to live on a sailboat. I just bought a boat which I’ll learn to sail and go out and test the conditions next year. We had a first meeting in September and I expect to arrange another one in December/January.

    #7618
    Avatar of Lasse-Birk-Olesen
    Lasse-Birk-Olesen
    Participant
    #7554
    Avatar of Lasse-Birk-Olesen
    Lasse-Birk-Olesen
    Participant

    Regarding winter weather, it’s of course an issue to have in mind. But while it may be that the Baltic is a less than perfect location, it is a well worked issue: It’s not like living in a boat in the Baltic is a new thing, it’s just new to want to do it away from the coast. People are already living in houseboats year round in habor. Jeff, why would a boat be significantly harder to heat than a house?

    A comparison with the Mediterranean would indeed be interesting. If it turns out the Med is better, Baltic Seasteading could be seen as an incremental step for people living in the area on the way to Mediterranean Seasteading.

    #7522
    Avatar of Lasse-Birk-Olesen
    Lasse-Birk-Olesen
    Participant

    Carl wrote:
    There are no proper international waters in the Baltic though…

    It’s all EEZs, yes, but it’s way big enough for seasteaders to escape the contiguous zones. As long as we don’t pump up oil or fish for commercial purposes, we should be able to do whatever we want.

    #7298
    Avatar of Lasse-Birk-Olesen
    Lasse-Birk-Olesen
    Participant

    Ah, it seems it doesn’t matter if the box is checked or not. When unchecking it, I still have access to this forum. Guess I just didn’t notice it before.

    #7288
    Avatar of Lasse-Birk-Olesen
    Lasse-Birk-Olesen
    Participant

    I only just found the box to check in my profile now. Don’t think I was told about it.

    #6335
    Avatar of Lasse-Birk-Olesen
    Lasse-Birk-Olesen
    Participant

    If you haven’t done so already, you could read the Seasteading book and have a look at its references: http://seasteading.org/seastead.org/book_beta/section_index.html

    Lots of great info in there.

    #6315
    Avatar of Lasse-Birk-Olesen
    Lasse-Birk-Olesen
    Participant

    Some that came up on a libertarian forum:

    #6052
    Avatar of Lasse-Birk-Olesen
    Lasse-Birk-Olesen
    Participant

    Pastor_Jason wrote:
    Can I answer your question with a question?

    What is it about less waves in the ocean that would make it easier to build a seastead?

    It seems as though the problems you are looking at are putting the cart before the horse. Development of a seastead design and engineering issues need to come before worries about eventual location of the seastead (international waters and minimal wave issues are just some of the factors that will go into this decision). The purpose of a seastead outpost, like the one operating in SF Bay area, is to focus on developing seastead tech. Belize is a good spot for this.

    I’m not saying you should build the seastead on the ocean. But building a seastead on land to handle 10 meter waves is a different story than building a seastead to handle 5 meter waves.

    Waves are probably the single most powerful and price-raising force you have to deal with on the ocean. The energy carried by a wave increases by the square of it’s height so just doubling the wave height from 5 to 10 meters results in quadrupling the factor of units of energy from 25 to 100! Your seastead has to be able to withstand this force. There have been reports of even large ships being, not just turned over, but crushed by waves.

    There is no doubt that it will be an easier engineering task to design for calm waters and it will be much cheaper to build as well. This means that the ultimate goal of the Seasteading Outpost, to build a functional seastead for international waters, can be achieved sooner if it is built with direct access to calm international waters.

    If waves are an issue, why not find a location near the doldrums… the ocean gets as flat as glass some days.

    Sure, setting out for any calm body of water would be an advantage in my opinion, I’m not proposing the European seas for personal reasons. However, from what my Googling tells me, the Doldrums are occasionally plagued by hurricanes. And the distance to any landbased city seems to be longer.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 24 total)