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  • #22303
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    Kaseijin
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    What would be the purpose of incorporating a seastead as a local government in the United States? Incorporation protects communities from abuse form local government and allows them to create their own laws.

     

    A person may stay on a ship only as long as her captain permits it. Two ships may dock to each other only as long as both captains permit it. That allows a seastead to create laws regardless of government recognition. Others can’t force you to follow their laws, because you can relocate.

     

    A seastead differs from an incorporated community in that you can move it out of a state and it’s easier to quit or split it.

    #20557
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    Kaseijin
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    JP Aerospace is working toward a manned suborbital station planned to be used for orbital delivery, research and tourism.

    Sky is not very good for steading because every useful kg comes with a huge balloon, which rises cost a lot. Making a flying house is much more expensive and harder than building on land or water.

    #16793
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    Kaseijin
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    Christopher wrote:

    I don’t see the depth of the ocean as an issue anymore because even if you consider, lets say 2.5 miles (which comprises more than half of the oceans average depth) it would not be impraticable to dump enough filling untill you form a small island. And even in the middle of the ocean you can find shallower areas of a mile or a mile and a half.

    A pile of trash half the height of Mt. Everest is practical?
    You have to convince every person on Earth to donate a few tons and pay for transport.

    #16657
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    Kaseijin
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    the energy is clearly provided by the hydrogen in the water, it is already there, with an electrical arc you’re simply breaking up the water so that it is usable as a fuel.
    That would be a perpetuum mobile, however it is not what this system does.
    Electrical retort system converts carbon and water to carbon monoxide and hydrogen. So it is a carbon power plant, but unlike usual coal burning you use water instead of oxygen and you can use it to produce hydrogen. Also it seems that it can be easily turned on/off and can work well on small scale, so if you want to power a seastead by burning carbon, it may be better than an oven.
    #16126
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    Kaseijin
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    chadsims wrote:
    Not sure we’d go with trees but their’d be room, and it wouldn’t be allowed to grow to big in any case

    Remember that roots can break concrete.

    You neglect a baobab when it’s little, and you may find yourself homeless.

    #16125
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    Kaseijin
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    OCEANOPOLIS wrote:
    Also, the key element for such business success is the presence of a reef and Columbia doesn’t have one. (or does it?)

    They have less reefs than most of Caribbean, but they have some: http://www.wri.org/map/caribbean-region

    World wrote:
    There are about 2,000 sq km of coral reef areas within the Colombian Caribbean. About two-thirds of Colombia’s coral reefs in the Caribbean are [...] located more than 700 km from the Colombian continental coast. Colombia’s Caribbean coastline stretches 1,700 kilometers, but coral reefs are restricted to fewer than 150 km.

    http://www.wri.org/publication/content/7881

    #16111
    Avatar of Kaseijin
    Kaseijin
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    I’m assuming an offshore community will be very much like a small island or a small ship. With little real estate – little elbow room – I’m guessing it has the potential to be a little bit of a pressure cooker – and the anonymity and freedom to ignore each other that people normally use to manage their relationships with others may not be present.
    Hi!
    That could be a problem on a monolithic seastead, but if it’s modular you can change neighbourhood without leaving your house.
    At start tensions would be reduced by proximity to land and non-seasteaders, later by size of a seastead, choice of different seasteads and finally by people who move in for reasons other than their worldview.
    How much community work and shared resources is best for running a seastead is an open question until someone builds one.
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