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  • #14086
    Avatar of Jesrad
    Jesrad
    Participant

    Bump for awesomeness. Such well-thought out projects using interesting opportunitues and having a business potential are exactly what we need to get seasteading started. I see it has been a few months already, and would love to know how it’s coming up :)

    #14077
    Avatar of Jesrad
    Jesrad
    Participant

    Beyond the couple knee-jerk negatives they seem sensible, also this one has a point:
    ” It is very , very costly to have a condition survey done on a ferro boat.”

    Integrity is hard to check on ferrocement… Many techniques even require a dry-docking, which is not feasible once your stead grows a reef. What about seperating the home and the reef, making the former more traditionnally built and the latter permanent and modular ?

    #14075
    Avatar of Jesrad
    Jesrad
    Participant

    The plastic there is not even confetti-sized, most of it is in microscopic particles suspended in the top 3-10 meters of water… Also, the oceanic gyres are deserted of life much in the same way cold, dry and high-altitude deserts are on land, because of absence of coast, no lighted ground underwater to grow anything on, and oxygen + minerals deprivation from little to no circulation. It makes no sense buildinf a city there.

    Liberty=do what you will with what is not someone else’s

    Justice=treat others as you would have them treat you

    Politics=the ends are the means, and vice-versa

    #14041
    Avatar of Jesrad
    Jesrad
    Participant

    Actually you are grossly misinformed. Lifespan in hunter-gatherer tribes is higher than in early agricultural civilizations. For example average lifespan was around 36 years in typical paleolithic times then dropped to 18 by early sumerians, and then painfully rised to between 21 and 24 under roman empire… Besides the modal age in primitive tribes is always above 60 years, so instead of voicing clichés I suggest you go read serious studies on the subject ( http://www.google.fr/m/url?client=safari&ei=gjAMTpD0HZG5jAeohfHwAQ&hl=fr&oe=UTF-8&q=http://www.anth.ucsb.edu/faculty/gurven/papers/pdrdraft04182006.pdf&ved=0CCYQFjAD&usg=AFQjCNFSkObwGtcznkmryieWgDyhTw5S8A ) Average life expectancy among hunter-gatherer tribes is really just marred by infant mortality rates exactly as it was in antique civilisations, our own modern increases in lifespans are due almost entirely to advances in medecine that reduce this early mortality ; once this is taken off balance you see that ‘primitives’ can and do enjoy “modern” lifespans with an average modal age of 72 years.

    You are also entirely wrong on the second point, as the average time spent by a typical hunter gatherer dailyonr food is around 4 hours of work. Please research before posting.

    Just to make myself clear: I am merely pointing out that the ocean is vastly different an habitat than land, so that approaches to food production typically land-based are bad solutions to pursue. My other point is that, given those differences, we will almost certainly end up with a ‘typical seasteader diet’ very different from, say, the average american diet, and that a whole new food culture is yet to be developped.

    Liberty=do what you will with what is not someone else’s

    Justice=treat others as you would have them treat you

    Politics=the ends are the means, and vice-versa

    #14033
    Avatar of Jesrad
    Jesrad
    Participant

    As far as food goes, after studying nutrition (and consequently, health) intensively for the past two years, I conclude several things:
    - homo sapiens did great for hundreds of thousands of years perusing what was available locally, no matter where he went on the planet, no matter how extreme it seems
    - industrial age food did him in, starting with early agriculture (turns out cereals aren’t really food except for birds), especially as more processes are applied, and as food becomes more uniformised across the world folmowing culture, the diseases associated with it spread too

    So, the last thing would-be seasteaders should do regarding food, is to import or replicate the problems already present today on land. Instead they should follow the tried-and-true method that made our species so successful so far: gather, forage, find uses for what is readily available, make as little waste as possible from your resources, and adapt to it. Trying to engineer an ocean habitat into traditional land just to make it into a familiar environment again is a recipe for disaster. Seasteads will have their own, yet-uninvented food culture. Discovering it is also part of pioneer work.

    Liberty=do what you will with what is not someone else’s

    Justice=treat others as you would have them treat you

    Politics=the ends are the means, and vice-versa

    #9996
    Avatar of Jesrad
    Jesrad
    Participant

    You don’t necessarily need the cable tied to the bottom, if it reaches lower than about half the current wave’s maximal length, it’ll find still water that is not moving up and down. Attach a set of heave plates there, that would work almost as well as an anchor in damping vertical bobbing of the seastead, without compromising mobility (much).

    #9991
    Avatar of Jesrad
    Jesrad
    Participant

    Under no power, a boat will line up parallel to the waves, that is perpendicular to their progression. A seastead that is built to hit waves “head-first” can take advantage of that by being slightly wider than long so it’ll slowly turn to face the progression of the biggest waves there are around.

    #8441
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    Jesrad
    Participant

    Exactly what I need, thanks :)

    #7889
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    Jesrad
    Participant

    Just a quick thought: a spar could include a flexible buoy near the surface, that would compress and dilate with wave heaving (when wave soars, the pressure on it increases and thus its buoyancy decreases, damping the heaving effect, and inversely when the water level drops at the wave trough). Make it a compressed air inverted bell section, for example.

    #7678
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    Jesrad
    Participant

    Why not do it for showing off then ? I’m pretty sure a number of very wealthy Hollywood stars that would love to show their appreciation for sustainable development and ecology while at the same time having a bigger yacht than everyone else, by buying an actual tropical island that floats and moves around and recycles its own water while producing its own energy ;)

    #6131
    Avatar of Jesrad
    Jesrad
    Participant

    Eelco wrote:

    Ive been working on something that starts from pretty much the same reasoning as this. Big beefy hollow concrete cylinder, displacing lots of water, basalt on the bottom, and you have something rather steady. It moves up and down with the waves, but thats tolerable.

    Will post pictures, motivation, and my order of magnitude estimates soon.

    Great ! Can’t wait for more details :)

    #4837
    Avatar of Jesrad
    Jesrad
    Participant

    I had seen videos of small fixed wing UAVs that would take off and land “upright” and fly in horizontal, usual plane stance. Too bad I can’t seem to put my hands back on them :(

    #4836
    Avatar of Jesrad
    Jesrad
    Participant

    Very interesting find, that Molten Salt Oxidation thing ! And I’m also a firm believer in the practicality of MSRs for long-lasting, efficient and very reasonable power generation :)

    however there’s still one problem to solve before going on a cleaning frenzy in the oceans: at the gyres, the density of plastic very very low, so extracting the plastic and collecting large enough quantities of it are very expensive in time and efforts.

    #4722
    Avatar of Jesrad
    Jesrad
    Participant

    One thing that can be tried, is to brake the waves horizontally below the waterline. The rationale for this is that periodic lateral efforts do not affect a seastead’s comfort as much as periodic vertical efforts, especially when the seastead has a lot of wet surface. Since the waves’ energy travels in a forward-rolling circle, we can put obstacles to this travel at any point of the circle: instead of opposing the up and down movement, we can oppose the forward and back movement. Instead of entraining water with horizontal plates, let’s entrain water with vertical plates and lay this wavebraker flat at some depth. Think of it as an enhanced version of Patri’s “aikido” breakwater.

    #4693
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    Jesrad
    Participant

    The $200 I promised earlier are sent (just like last time: from secondlife to paypal).

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 264 total)