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What animals would a seastead farm?

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This topic contains 5 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of i_is_j_smith i_is_j_smith 1 year, 8 months ago.

Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
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  • #21406
    Profile photo of Kevin Bales
    Kevin Bales
    Participant

    Now, those of you focusing on ultra-modern carbon-fiber  casinos probably don’t give a lot of thought subsistence farming but you simply cannot have a truly elegant meal with frozen meat. What can we put on the table when we are tired of seafood?

     

     

    I’ll go first.

     

    From Wikipedia:

    “The wild Green Junglefowl is a mangrove forest adapted species. Unlike the Red Junglefowl, the ancestor of most domestic chickens, it is adapted for life with little fresh water. [edit]. It also feeds on aquatic animals washed up on the shores and littoral pools, which Red Junglefowl are unable to do. At low tide, Green Junglefowl forage for starfish, small crabs, copepods and detritus. ”

     

    A cross between the domestic chicken and Green Junglefowl is possible, happens in nature.  So we could breed for all the traits that the domestic has acquired over the centuries.  My guess is; tastes like chicken.

     

    Now, what about red meat?

    Who tastes good and tolerates salt water?

    #21412
    Profile photo of elspru
    elspru
    Participant

    Mostly a Seastead would be looking at farming aquatic vegetation and animals.

    For instance with the Pillarstead design I have there is significant underwater “seafloor”,

    on which various seacreatures can grow,  which will attract fish and larger aquatic life.

     

    I’m considering a new design more like an Atoll,  and then can farm various aquatics inside.

    Could even have a no engine inside policy to minimize the pollution and such.

    Also preventing non-locals from fishing our hard earned seafood crops.

     

    We’d have to start with the vegetation of course,

    especially micro-algaes such as isochrysis galbana (DHA), tetraselmis (DHA+EPA), nanochloropsis (EPA),

    can also introduce macro algaes,  red gracilaria, brown kelp,  and other edible seaweed.

     

    In terms of animals like stuff, there is plenty

    various plankton copepods, amphipods, rotifiers, krill, shrimp

    and of course the usual boat dwellers barnacles, limpets, mussels, oysters,

    and some motiles squid, crabs, lobsters, sea cucumbers, maybe even some edible jellyfish.

     

    Of course various pellagic fish would be great, anchovies, sardines, herring,   carp

    if we have superfluous amounts we may even be able to support some larger fish like cod, perch and pike.

     

    Though yes, assuming it grew large enough to support soil, or we have some walkways and such,

    then it would be possible to have mangroves, grasses, mango’s, coconuts, pineapples.

    Then we’d have to introduce the food for land animals, grain, grasses and insects of various types.

    At which point we can probably introduce the green junglefowl.

     

    Something we could introduce and potentially raise our eco-friendliness points by are some endangered species,

    though we’d have to set up a good environment for them first of course.

    such as the Salt Marsh Harvest Mouse, the Fishing Cat.

     

    If and when the Salt Marsh Harvest Mice have become prolific,

    can introduce the Swimming Cat, Turkish Van, which would happily prey on them, and fish.

     

    Crab-eat macaques are also an option, they may also be trained to pick coconuts and such potentially,

    though they may pose a thread to the endangered animals, and aren’t particularly meaty or anything.

     

    we could also make habitat for seabirds like Boobies, which like to land on ships.

    and Cormorants which can be used to fish.

    In temperate water, Penguins are also an option,

    such as the Galapagos Penguin or Humboldt Penguin.

    Attracting seals may also be an option.

     

    Mostly though,  the diet would be seafood, low on the food chain,

    and that’s really the healthiest kind anyways, so should be good.

     

     

    #21421
    Profile photo of spark
    spark
    Participant

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Mangroves1.JPG

     

     

    I could grow mangrove font of my boat in the dock.

    I let you know

     

    #21428
    Profile photo of Kevin Bales
    Kevin Bales
    Participant

    Sparky,

    Interesting. For a small craft a small saltwater marsh garden that could be hauled aboard when underway would be nice. Interesting and decorative even before it was productive.

     

    elspru,

    Of course seaweed and fish is our bread and butter but copepod butter on kelp sandwiches would get old sooner or later.

    One thought was that the dietary requirements of humans may favor a terrestrial diet and another is that many people on the seastead might be tourists and that offering some traditional foods besides seafood would be almost necessary.

    Keeping a healthy cow would consume as much resources as a small family. Marine mammals are smart, cute and popular. It would be bad politics to slice them up for the buffet.

    Another reason to drag around a mangrove swamp is that a forest on a boat would look very impressive (again I’m thinking of tourists) and, taking advantage of extant halophilic ecosystems would probably make it pretty easy. The fishing cats and monkeys would be a real crowd pleaser. Making the floating garden modular would allow us to separate species that wouldn’t necessarily get along well.

     

    There is a salt marsh wallaby but that’snot what I was hoping for.

    Oh well, look like steaks have to be flown in.

     

    #21777
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    I was going to go with chickens, rabbits, and maybe goats.

    But if my living space was also my transportation, there’s tons of places i could not pull into for any reason unless i wanted to deal with giving them all my animals for quarantine. So animals, and probably a few plants, are out of the farm until i can figure how to leave my home and garden out on the high seas and take the boat into shore. I was hoping the recent usa supreme court decision about “house boat” vs “floating not-a-vessel house” would help with this issue, regarding the not-a-vessel house and maritime laws. Many people are upset the MV Lyubov Orlova is floating along with no one on it, but if i leave my house floating in the Sargasso while i boat in to Bahamas, Azores, or Bermuda, there’s no difference between my house and that ship. I don’t want deal with animal and plant quarantine to pick up some propane and tumeric!

    #21815
    Profile photo of i_is_j_smith
    i_is_j_smith
    Participant

    These two sites have plenty of information on the space and welfare requirements for various farm livestock:

     

    http://www.fao.org/ag/againfo/programmes/en/lead/toolbox/Indust/Standard.htm

    http://www.animalfarmlife.eu/index.html

     

    The problem with any kind of terrestrial animal on a seastead will be space requirements.  You are usually looking at around 10-20 broiler chickens per m^2 and around 2-3 100kg pigs per 2m^2 depending on size.  You get fewer animals per a given space for “organic” ones, higher for us heathens who like more meat and care less about the animals’s feelings.

     

    You won’t have to worry about setting aside space topside, nearly all industrial livestock farming is done completely indoors so you won’t have to worry about salt spray, animals going overboard, etc.  Just set aside enough internal hull space for the number of animals you need to grow.

     

    As for docking, there are actually only a few countries that require you to worry about animals that will remain on the vessel.  They care more about animals that are going ashore.  Hawaii is a total pain, requiring you to quarantine the animals ashore even if you had no plans of taking them off the boat.  But plenty of countries don’t care about the animals as long as they remain on board (and sometimes require you to post a small bond).  This page has some examples:

     

    <A href=”http://books.google.com/books?id=CjIg5FgUUW8C&pg=PA17&lpg=PA17&dq=boat+docking+animal+quarantine&source=bl&ots=77x3pNtCGj&sig=Fy-UC0b52eG56jtR1oZykwNY4a8&hl=en&sa=X&ei=Cv8_UePSFtXi4AOLmYCAAg&sqi=2&ved=0CD4Q6AEwAw#v=onepage&q=boat%20docking%20animal%20quarantine&f=false”>Landfalls of paradise</A>

     

    So as long as you keep your farm animals onboard, and hopefully belowdecks, you shouldn’t have any issues in many ports around the world.

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