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WaterWalker from used utility poles and big buoys

Home Forums Archive Structure Designs WaterWalker from used utility poles and big buoys

This topic contains 65 replies, has 12 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of Dil Dil 5 years, 10 months ago.

Viewing 6 posts - 61 through 66 (of 66 total)
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  • #4693
    Profile photo of Jesrad
    Jesrad
    Participant

    The $200 I promised earlier are sent (just like last time: from secondlife to paypal).

    #4694
    Profile photo of vincecate
    vincecate
    Participant

    >The $200 I promised earlier are sent (just like last time: from secondlife to paypal).

    Thanks much! The $500 total that I got for building WaterWalker2 and going on a maiden voyage just about covered the material costs.

    I am trying to get $400 toward a $675 kite and have pledges for a total of $300 so far. Can people pledge to cover the last $100 so I can go get this kite? You only pay after WaterWalker2 is taken on a trip of at least 1.5 miles and documented on he wiki. I will measure speed and how far off the wind I can go with this better kite on a less windy day than the first trip. I also expect to have a better platform solution. Going further from the beach we should get larger waves to test in. The biggest waves on the first trip were about 3 feet.

    – Vince

    #4730
    Profile photo of Steffen
    Steffen
    Participant

    vincecate wrote:

    Can people pledge to cover the last $100 so I can go get this kite?

    I will sponsor the remaining $100. Thank you for all your constructive input.

    #4757
    Profile photo of vincecate
    vincecate
    Participant

    Steffen:

    >I will sponsor the remaining $100. Thank you for all your constructive input.

    Thanks much! I just called and the kite is still for sale. I will go buy it tomorrow morning.

    I have started a page for the second trip. I expect to do it in the second half of February. Plan is to be at least 1.5 miles long on GPS track.

    http://wiki.seasteading.org/index.php/User:Vincecate/WaterWalker2trip2

    — Vince

    You have to take life as it happens, but you should try to make it
    happen the way you want to take it.
    – German Proverb

    #4812
    Profile photo of vincecate
    vincecate
    Participant

    Found a way to drive to a good beach for launching:

    http://wiki.seasteading.org/index.php/User:Vincecate/AnguillaTestLocations#Ride_On_Model_Test_Locations

    I also got the new kite (image below) and put up an image showing the planned route:

    http://wiki.seasteading.org/index.php/User:Vincecate/WaterWalker2trip2

    Still expecting to launch second trip later this month.

    #4851
    Profile photo of Dil
    Dil
    Participant

    One problem with aluminum is that it can form a type of electrolysis with the salt water (slightly polarized).

    In short, it oxidizes and you lose material off your aluminum poles and that errodes it in the long run. You can fix this by setting up a very simple zinc sacrificial electrode. Or you can buy marine grade aluminum, but I don’t know how much that is.

    http://www.yachtsurvey.com/corrosion.htm

    I’ve read a few sites saying that it was a bad idea to use aluminum.

    Aluminum cannot be cast in good marine grade alloys, thus all aluminum castings corrode like a banshee. Aluminum is extremely vulnerable to crevice corrosion, which is why so many aluminum tanks fail. Don’t blame the material, blame the installer for not doing it right. Done right, aluminum tanks will last forever. Fuel tanks, that is, not water tanks. AL should not be used for water tanks, period.

    Aluminum is similar to Corten steel in that it develops a layer of self-protecting oxide. This layer is so thin you can’t even see it, but it’s there. Quality marine alloys don’t corrode and fail, except where crevices may exist, and when joined to dissimilar metals. That’s why it’s nearly impossible to keep paint on aluminum window frames when secured with stainless screws.

    Keeping paint on aluminum is extremely difficult, and requires very careful and proper preparation. All these boats with painted but corroding window and door frames are the result of just shooting the raw aluminum without proper preparation procedures, many without even the proper primers that are indispensable to making the paint stay on. Worse, many boats these days simply use residential or recreational grade windows and doors that are not even a marine grade aluminum. There’s no hope for this stuff.

    Needless to say, this is what makes maintaining stern drives so difficult. Not only are they vulnerable to galvanism because of all the different metals in the drive, but it only takes a very small amount of stray current to cause serious damage, as shown in the photos above.

    Revolution starts in the mind.

Viewing 6 posts - 61 through 66 (of 66 total)

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