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Waste Disposal

Home Forums Archive Structure Designs Waste Disposal

This topic contains 41 replies, has 13 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of  Anonymous 4 years, 9 months ago.

Viewing 12 posts - 31 through 42 (of 42 total)
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  • #2345
    Profile photo of pixael
    pixael
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    #2461
    Profile photo of polyparadigm
    polyparadigm
    Participant

    I guess I should’ve lurked more before making digesters their own thread. -Joel

    #2465
    Profile photo of thebastidge
    thebastidge
    Participant

    Methane digesters are probably worth their own thread.

    #2481
    Profile photo of xoid
    xoid
    Participant

    Shit floats due to a gas and fat in it. IF fragmented, and put deep in ocean (pressured) it sinks.

    #2603
    Profile photo of Sundiver
    Sundiver
    Participant

    At sea waste treatment is a mature technology. They are generally termed MSD’s for marine sanitation devices.

    http://www.redfoxenviro.com/

    http://www.headhunterinc.com/

    This still leaves a high nitrate content, high nutrient product that can be used in a hydroponic system or cleaned for discharge with a constructed wetland system. But I think you’re right it should be utilized constructively. “Waste equals food”. Aquaponics is the way to go.

    The other forms of garbage can simply be refused entry. Lots of states are working on waste reduction. If an auto plant can have zero waste, the seastead can.

    #2628
    Profile photo of polyparadigm
    polyparadigm
    Participant

    Materials that are transparent to UV are also fairly expensive. And, as another commenter pointed out, the UV won’t penetrate far. A solar trough collector could be used to pasteurize the waste stream, or at least some part of it. This would mean holding some quantity of blackwater until the sun comes out, but I don’t think a methane-fired backup system would be too onerous.

    –Joel

    #9094
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    Consider using a 2-phase(or more) treatment. Go for a methane digester, followed by an aerobic one. Aerobic systems can offer chlorine final-stage treatment, via electrolysis and saline solution(sea water, anyone?).

    Methane digesters can remove most of the pathogens and produce useful methane… Scrub the gasses generated by bubbling it through hydrated lime/water solution, to remove CO2, and you have excellent heating/cooking gas.

    Lime solution can be regenerated, with applied heat, to release the CO2… Enrich the greenhouse? After the waste passes through the system, use it for hydroponic gardening.

    Use the grey-water, from showers/bath-tubs, for flushing the toilets and sub-surface watering of non-hydroponic gardening… Grey-water to flush the toilets can reduce overall water usage significantly.

    #9097
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    Adding a third phase, before utilization for grey-water, increases productivity…

    An open-top mini-pond with Tilapia and Duckweed. Duckweed can be used as a chicken feed supplement, it’s as high in protein as Soy, but it’s a complete protein, so it’s more nutritious… I’ve even run across a recipe for “Duckweed Soup.”

    If this system is small, it provides some additional supplies for the Seasted. Larger ‘community’ systems can provide fish for export…

    #9144
    Profile photo of sda1950
    sda1950
    Participant

    “Scrub the gasses generated by bubbling it through hydrated lime/water solution, to remove CO2, and you have excellent heating/cooking gas.”

    I’ve heard, but not tested, that there is no need to remove the CO2 if you are just burning the methane digesters gasses. If you are using the gasses in an ICE, then there is a need to remove the CO2.

    #9145
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    One very good reason to scrub the CO2 out, is to reduce the total volume of gas to be stored. CO2 can make-up a very large portion of the gas, if the digester isn’t operating properly. Even when it’s running near peak efficiency, CO2 is around 20% by volume, of the gas. It’s easy enough to do and worth the effort, if you ask me. Besides that, I’ll use it to enrich my greenhouse, for higher productivity. More produce, fewer purchases!

    There are other ways to remove the CO2. One involves a 3-stage, cooled(between each stage and after the 3rd stage of compression) piston compressor. Compress it and cool it as much as possible, spray it into a sealed chamber, suck the Methane out and you manually sqeeze the ‘snow’ into blocks of dry-ice. I don’t know the pressures involved, but I remember reading about it in a Peace Corps manual. It was designed for use in 3rd World countries…

    Either way, you get something worth having, for the effort involved.

    #9849
    Profile photo of xiagos
    xiagos
    Participant

    Waste is waste only if the valuable resources it contains are recovered and utilized. Plastics in the waste stream can be collected and recycled. Metals in that same waste stream can likewise be collected and recycled. They mostly leaves complex organic material to deal with, and this can be the most valuable resource of all.

    First, chop the organics up into fine particles and place them in a methane generator, as has already been suggested. The by-products are methane gas, that can be used as fuel or for power generation, and a nutrient rich sludge. The sludge is sent to a settler tank which seperates un-digested particles (that are sent back to the digester) from the liquid.

    This liquid is then send to either a hydroponics unit that produces fruits and veggies, or to an algae tank.In both cases, UV-rays from sunlight sterilize the water and the plants remove the nutrients (mostly nitrates/nitrites and phsophates from the water. The water is filtered to produce non-potable water (for washing). Some of the non-potable water is passed through a UV water treatment chamber to make potable water.

    The algae is collected from the tank and sent to a shrimp (or other marine organism) pond as food. The shrimp is harvested in time for consumption in the seastead, or sold to a shrimp processor. Other marine organisms will be harvested and sent to fish tanks as food. What ever fish are grown in this tank follows in the path of the shrimp.

    By using engineering to duplicate natural life-cycles, we turn our so-called waste into wholesome food and water. We eliminate the need of using large amounts of energy or machinery to eliminate nearly all of our waste stream. And, we save ourselves the cost of importing fertizers, food, fish foods, and maybe even fresh water for our own survival. And, we certainly have eliminated the negatives of dumping wastes to foul our own waters, the waters of our neighbours, and created potential unintended consequences of our own bad stewardship.

    #9892
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    xiagos wrote:

    Waste is waste only if the valuable resources it contains are recovered and utilized. Plastics in the waste stream can be collected and recycled. Metals in that same waste stream can likewise be collected and recycled. They mostly leaves complex organic material to deal with, and this can be the most valuable resource of all.

    First, chop the organics up into fine particles and place them in a methane generator, as has already been suggested. The by-products are methane gas, that can be used as fuel or for power generation, and a nutrient rich sludge. The sludge is sent to a settler tank which seperates un-digested particles (that are sent back to the digester) from the liquid.

    Wrong. Most of the sludge is unusable by a Methane Digester (or it would have been digested), however, the liquid is useful by innoculating and mixing with the incoming charge.

    xiagos wrote:
    This liquid is then send to either a hydroponics unit that produces fruits and veggies, or to an algae tank.In both cases, UV-rays from sunlight sterilize the water and the plants remove the nutrients (mostly nitrates/nitrites and phsophates from the water. The water is filtered to produce non-potable water (for washing). Some of the non-potable water is passed through a UV water treatment chamber to make potable water.

    After a Methane Digester has fully processed wastes, the result is better than 99% free of pathogens. Following with an Aerobics Digester is such a drastic change of conditions that it insures the removal of the pathogens. No need for UV. Settle the remaining solids and use this water in the Aerobics, like with the Anaerobics. Remaining solids can be used to raise earthworms as fish food, producing casings to use as liquid fertilizer…

    xiagos wrote:
    The algae is collected from the tank and sent to a shrimp (or other marine organism) pond as food. The shrimp is harvested in time for consumption in the seastead, or sold to a shrimp processor. Other marine organisms will be harvested and sent to fish tanks as food. What ever fish are grown in this tank follows in the path of the shrimp.

    Using Duckweed is more effective and produces vegetable protein that can be used as feed or consumed by those that want it, as a salad.

    xiagos wrote:
    By using engineering to duplicate natural life-cycles, we turn our so-called waste into wholesome food and water. We eliminate the need of using large amounts of energy or machinery to eliminate nearly all of our waste stream. And, we save ourselves the cost of importing fertizers, food, fish foods, and maybe even fresh water for our own survival. And, we certainly have eliminated the negatives of dumping wastes to foul our own waters, the waters of our neighbours, and created potential unintended consequences of our own bad stewardship.

    Integrated Multi Trophic Aquaponics (IMTA) can be expanded to produce fresh-water fish and prawn, along with fruits and vegetables. Earthworms as fish food, fish waste as prawn food, prawn waste as bacteria food, bacteria waste as plant food… It’s on here, too…

    Still need fresh water to keep each step operable/topped-off, but each step, as I’ve outlined, wastes less water and material. Simple solar distillation of seawater can provide fresh water…

    Later,

    J.L..F.

    If you can’t swim with the big fish, stick to the reef

Viewing 12 posts - 31 through 42 (of 42 total)

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