1. Skip to navigation
  2. Skip to content
  3. Skip to sidebar




Skills needed by seasteaders

Home Forums Community General Chat Skills needed by seasteaders

This topic contains 11 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by Avatar of arcturus arcturus 2 years, 6 months ago.

Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #1624
    Avatar of Todesking
    Todesking
    Participant

    What are some skills seasteaders would need to learn before coming onto a seastead. Lets face it just because they have the money to afford a room it does not mean they have the skills to get things done on the seastead. Every member living on the seastead would be needed to be skilled in multiple useable skills. Once on the seastead the inhabitants would also have to train in new skill sets to make sure you have back up workers if something unexpected happens and the main person handling a certain function.

    Skills needed

    Welder

    Plumber

    Electrcian

    HAM Radio Operator

    Greenhouse Gardening

    Hydroponics Gardening

    Animal Husbandry

    Foreign Language Speakers

    Paramedic

    Firefighting

    Generator Mechanic

    Alternative Power Technician

    Herbalist

    Nurse

    SCUBA Diving

    General Handyman

    Helicopter pilot

    Would anyone like to add to the list?

    #15352
    Avatar of shredder7753
    shredder7753
    Participant

    wealth creatatater

    ____________

    My Work II

    “Leadership and do-ership are not the same thing”

    #15364
    Avatar of elspru
    elspru
    Participant

    Todesking wrote:

    What are some skills seasteaders would need to learn before coming onto a seastead. Lets face it just because they have the money to afford a room it does not mean they have the skills to get things done on the seastead. Every member living on the seastead would be needed to be skilled in multiple useable skills. Once on the seastead the inhabitants would also have to train in new skill sets to make sure you have back up workers if something unexpected happens and the main person handling a certain function.

    Skills needed

    Welder

    Plumber

    Electrcian

    HAM Radio Operator

    Greenhouse Gardening

    Hydroponics Gardening

    Animal Husbandry

    Foreign Language Speakers

    Paramedic

    Firefighting

    Generator Mechanic

    Alternative Power Technician

    Herbalist

    Nurse

    SCUBA Diving

    General Handyman

    Helicopter pilot

    Would anyone like to add to the list?

    while all of these could be potentially beneficial,

    some or perhaps many of them are optional.

    We can focus on what we Need, or require for life,

    air, water, food, shelter, and ability to reproduce every part.

    In terms of abilities to recreate any concievable object,

    have to be able to gather materials, pierce them, bind them, and mold them, that’s it.

    Of course that’s a generic definition, and there are specifics for how to do each for a particular product.

    So one of the most important parts, is to have the tutorials available to do these things.

    I’m working on a human-speakable-programming-language to write/manage these tutorials.

    calm aware desire choice love express intuit move

    #15441
    Avatar of J.L.-Frusha
    J.L.-Frusha
    Participant

    Later,

    J.L.F.

    Never be afraid to try something new…

    Remember, amateurs built the ark, professionals built the Titanic.

    #15573
    Avatar of Pastor_Jason
    Pastor_Jason
    Participant

    This thread is the perfect evidence against attempting to mentally construct something as complicated as a lifestyle in a different (and hostile) environment. So far none of you has mentioned the obvious still that all sea-steaders would need, and that is the ability to swim. If you are seriously considering a life on the open ocean it is extremely likely that you will end up in the drink on occasion.

    You know the second most important characteristic you’ll need as a seasteader? Self denial. How good are you at not doing something that you want to do because someone else disagrees with you? Despite all of the ‘freedom’ concepts thrown back and forth by our resident libertarians (I count myself in that group) one of the realities of seasteading is going to be the fact that you’re forced to operate with a small group of people and leaving will not be as easy as you think. In those kinds of circumstances, your opinion will be weighed against the group consensus and when you lose you’ll have to flex with that decision. More importantly, if you’re going to work together effectively as a group then you might as well get used to not doing things your way. If something you do bothers another member of your crew, a wise seasteader will stop doing it to preserve the relationship rather than force his way and create tension in the group.

    The ocean is a harsh mistress, half-ass an attempt at seasteading at your own peril. It is concerns like those listed above that first inspired me to work on the concept of a seastead outpost before moving into the dangerous waters of the unknown. I still haven’t seen any suggested path to seasteading that is based in reality, until then I’m going to cling to the concepts I am confident will work. It is my earnest hope that another path can be created, as an outpost has it’s own issues to deal with.

    #15577
    Avatar of xns
    xns
    Participant

    What makes you think seasteaders will be any different from anyone else in the world?

    King Shannon of the Constitutional Monarchy of Logos.

    #15585
    Avatar of Pastor_Jason
    Pastor_Jason
    Participant

    xns wrote:

    What makes you think seasteaders will be any different from anyone else in the world?

    King Shannon of the Constitutional Monarchy of Logos.

    I don’t think Seasteaders will be different than anyone else in the world, I think they’ll be different than the pampered citizens of the developed nations. I don’t care how big you build it, the first seasteads will be frontier efforts filled with struggle and the looming possibility of death. The people who man these first steads will work together because to do otherwise would be to invite hardship and destruction.

    There are no Walmarts or Home Depots on the sea. If something critical breaks and you don’t have a spare you’re stuck having to ‘make do’ until you can pull in to port.

    Around the world there are plenty of folks that live this way. We look down on them and call them ‘tribal’ and shake our heads at the backwards way they do things. If you want to break into a new frontier, you’re going to need to find a tribe to do it with and adjust your lifestyle accordingly.

    You can listen to my wisdom now or wait until you board one of the seasteads to find out for yourself. It doesn’t matter what compact you signed at the docks once you’re in the ocean. Struggle will find you and force you to adapt to a social structure that works in a frontier setting. I just prefer to prepare myself ahead of time. None of you would consider leaving the shore without a supply of food, likewise I say you should have a supply of understanding in these areas that are bound to confront you.

    #15586
    Avatar of SailorTrash
    SailorTrash
    Participant

    Forget worrying about skills. I’ve been living aboard a boat for almost three years now, and the most important thing is keeping a level head. Things are going to go wrong. Stuff is going to break. Supplies are going to run low. The unexpected is going to get right up in your face. Keeping calm enough to handle it is at least as important as knowing how in the first place. If you can stay cool and think things through, you’re in pretty good shape.

    Knowing how to replace an alternator belt is great, and it’s easy in calm seas with good lighting and a cold beer next to you. But if you can’t do it when you’re freaking out because the deck is pitching, it’s the middle of the night with no lighting, and that cold beer is sprayed all over the place…well, knowing how didn’t really help, did it?

    Much like Eskimos and snow, boat people have over 30 words for “leak.”

    #15588
    Avatar of Pastor_Jason
    Pastor_Jason
    Participant

    The different between a live aboard situation and seasteading? The ability to step off your boat and onto a dock.

    It won’t be enough to keep a level head on a seastead but you’ll need the other occupants to keep a level head as well. Anytime you have more than 1 person involved in a situation it becomes complicated by the conflicting opinions. All I’m saying is head this issue off before it causes a problem by understanding it and attempting to address it while your feet remain on the land.

    I’ll bet money you’ll see the wisdom in this the moment your seastead suffers a critical emergency and you are told to “remain calm and stand over there, we’re attempting to keep this place from sinking and killing all of us and your input is distracting right now.” Opinions don’t matter at times like that and its very likely that someone else is going to have to make the decision of what is done for you without your consent. Makes you picky about who you sail with. Thus: tribal mentality exists and a completely open society does not.

    #15590
    Avatar of SailorTrash
    SailorTrash
    Participant

    Be prepared to give the folks around you something to do, ideally something useful. But regardless, people with a task are less likely to panic. Remember Jaws? “Chief. Put the fire out willya?”

    http://seagypsies-mikeandkatie.blogspot.com/

    Much like Eskimos and snow, boat people have over 30 words for “leak.”

    #15592
    Avatar of elspru
    elspru
    Participant

    Pastor_Jason wrote:

    None of you would consider leaving the shore without a supply of food,

    Historically pirate and even privateers (almost) always left shore without food, it helped to motivate the foraging and scavenging behaviours. Though initially it was mainly foraging from the land. Eventually led to attacking other ships, to get their supplies, to satiate the crews ravenous hunger.

    Pastor_Jason wrote:

    Thus: tribal mentality exists and a completely open society does not.

    Ya, I’ve gotten burned for making tribal assumptions, l lent some a married couple we liked some books, but then they turned on us, and now I don’t know if we’ll get those books back, even though they were some of the best… :-(

    SailorTrash wrote:

    Forget worrying about skills. I’ve been living aboard a boat for almost three years now, and the most important thing is keeping a level head. Things are going to go wrong. Stuff is going to break. Supplies are going to run low. The unexpected is going to get right up in your face. Keeping calm enough to handle it is at least as important as knowing how in the first place. If you can stay cool and think things through, you’re in pretty good shape.

    Knowing how to replace an alternator belt is great, and it’s easy in calm seas with good lighting and a cold beer next to you. But if you can’t do it when you’re freaking out because the deck is pitching, it’s the middle of the night with no lighting, and that cold beer is sprayed all over the place…well, knowing how didn’t really help, did it?

    Much like Eskimos and snow, boat people have over 30 words for “leak.”

    I think today I’ve demonstrated my ability to “keep a level head” considering my boat had been taken, and punctured. It was somewhat scary, I thought I had lost it for good, but did manage to find it again, bailed it out, and during the adventure overcame my fear of leaks and rocky water.

    All that meditation must have contributed to my ability to stay calm throughout the endeavour, I even rode over a small waterfall, which was probably one of the scariest parts.

    To be honest, I’m grateful to however got the boat as far as it did, since I truly was procrastinating too much. It’s always best to look at the positive. I posted a summary of my adventure on my ferrocement dinghy thread:

    http://www.seasteading.org/interact/forums/research/engineering/ferrocement-dinghy?page=5#comment-17984

    calm aware desire choice love express intuit move

    #19989
    Avatar of arcturus
    arcturus
    Participant

    1. Swimming.
    2. First aid.
    3. Navigation.
    4. Orientation.
    5. Psychological strenght.
    6. A DIY perspective.

Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.



Posted on at

Categories:

Written by

Blog/Newsletter

Donate