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Singapore Market

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This topic contains 5 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of vincecate vincecate 4 years, 8 months ago.

Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
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  • #1231
    Profile photo of kurt9
    kurt9
    Participant

    Singapore is a city-state that is running out of land for development. They are trying to buy sand from the Indonesians for land-fill construction. However, the Indonsians have a hissyfit in selling sand to Singapore for reasons of nationalism and economic inferiority complex (Singapore is composed of Chinese people whereas Indonesians are Malay and the Chinese tend to be more productive). The Singaporeans have even tried to buy an island from the Indonesians, but the Indonesians have declined. I think floating structures would be optimal for Singapore’s increasing demand for new land. Has anyone given thought to establishing a construction company that would build floating structures, residential and commercial, for the Singaporean market? Such a company would gain considerable competancy by building many residential and commercial floating structures over a 20 year period such that they would establish both the financial status and reputation such that they could build the ocean city-state (seastead), say, around 2030 or so. I really think this is the best approach to go.

    The biggest market for such a city-state will be the overseas Chinese of Southeast Asia who have never felt 100% comfortable living in their host countries of Malaysia and Indonesia. These people typically have multiple residences in S.E. Asia, Taiwan, and Canada or Australia in order to “diversify” their living and business. There are 30 million of these people who typically invest US$300K or more in a condominium in, say, Vancounver or Australia. They are our target market for the ocean city-state in 2030. A construction company that has been building residential and commerical floating properties in Singapore for 15-20 years would establish a solid enough reputation in Singapore that they could convince many overseas Chinese (kakkyo) to invest in such an ocean city-state. Especially if these people are on the receiving end of anti-Chinese pogroms like they were in Indonesia in spring of 1998.

    Any thoughts?

    #9940
    Profile photo of OCEANOPOLIS
    OCEANOPOLIS
    Participant

    ” They are our target market for the ocean city-state in 2030″ ?? Sry I have missed the memo, but who are “we” as in “our target market” ?

    Also, whats in 2030,… ocean, city, state?

    #9943
    Profile photo of xns
    xns
    Participant

    I think you’ve fallen for all our attempts at marketing pesudo-culture. And we’re still buying sand from indonesia, only difference being we’re using vietnamese companies as middle-men now. Furthermore, Singaporeans in general are extremely fearful of “new things” like seasteading. They’re taught from a young age to think conservatively, this is generally true of most Chinese that reside in Asia. Furthermore, a majority of the construction that happens here is outsourced to Mainland Chinese construction companies I.e. “China Construction”. So building a reputation is almost useless. furthermore, our territorial waters are more valuable as shipping lanes than residential areas. In fact, there is nothing left but shipping lanes and aquaculture plots.

    Finally, any attempts by a local company to start some sort of floating residential project wouldn’t hit the 3 main KPIs that get anything here any attention, those being;

    1) Bring in foreign investment (Big MNC willing to dump several billion into the local economy)

    2) Provide secondary or tertiary level jobs for locals (Well-paid, skilled labour jobs)

    3) Allow skills aquired by locals working for the MNC to be taught to other Singaporeans. (Middle management opportunities open to Singaporeans)

    And the attention is essential because the only seaspace available for lease are fish farming plots. And these cannot be used as residential units. I.e. No children allowed, only employees of the farm, all employees must carry their government issued passes, no visitors without prior permission from the government. Trust me, we’ve tried sending proposals and calling the relevant departments to explain seasteading. They basically told us to @#% off.

    As for where my information comes from, I am;

    – Singaporean by/since birth
    – Peranakan (Straits Chinese)
    – Managing Director of a Singapore based, Marine/Seasteading R&D company

    So there’s my cautionary note to anything looking at Singapore as a market for their SFSs.

    King Shannon of the Constitutional Monarchy of Logos.

    #9983
    Profile photo of kurt9
    kurt9
    Participant

    Oh well. I guess my idea won’t work.

    I know Singaporeans are conservative by nature, as are the overseas Chinese in the rest of South East Asia. I know that this conservatism does manifest itself in owning multiple residences in different countries (for example, Vancouver B.C.). I thought it might extend to seasteading concepts, since it would allow for complete political sefl-determination for the overseas Chinese that would live on them. I guess the engineering “newness” aspect of such seasteading is considered riskier than the political aspects of living in Malay countries such as Malaysia or Indonesia (Thailand seems long term hospitable for Chinese people).

    In any case, I think the best prospect for attracting investment for seasteading concepts is in places where real estate values are at a premium. Would the Hong Kong Chinese be interested in this concept? Can anyone here comment on this? Hong Kong is the only place I can think of that has more expensive real estate than Singapore. Tokyo’s real estate has declined over the past 18 years and still continues to decline.

    My point was that of an incremental approach to constructing seasteads is the only way to develop the knowledge and capability to build them. A construction company should start small, building floating individual houses and what not, then move on to larger and larger residential (apartment buildings) and commercial structures as the market develops for such. This provides a strategy for the incremental development of the technology and contruction techniques necessaru for the contruction of larger and larger stuctures on the ocean, while generating a cash stream while doing so. It will take 15-20 years of such experience to develope the knowledge and capability to build an entire seastead out on the open ocean (international waters). The knowledge and engineering to do such does not currently exist. It seems to me that the best market opportunity for this is port cities with the highest real estate values.

    #9984
    Profile photo of vincecate
    vincecate
    Participant

    kurt9 wrote:

    My point was that of an incremental approach to constructing seasteads is the only way to develop the knowledge and capability to build them. A construction company should start small, building floating individual houses and what not, then move on to larger and larger residential (apartment buildings) and commercial structures as the market develops for such. This provides a strategy for the incremental development of the technology and contruction techniques necessaru for the contruction of larger and larger stuctures on the ocean, while generating a cash stream while doing so.

    I think my Floating Villa plan is the most incremental of the seastead approaches I have seen. What do you think?

    http://wiki.seasteading.org/index.php/User:Vincecate/FloatingVilla

    http://wiki.seasteading.org/index.php/Seastead

    — Vince

    #9959
    Profile photo of reiselaender
    reiselaender
    Participant

    xnsdvd wrote:

    And the attention is essential because the only seaspace available for lease are fish farming plots. And these cannot be used as residential units. I.e. No children allowed, only employees of the farm, all employees must carry their government issued passes, no visitors without prior permission from the government. Trust me, we’ve tried sending proposals and calling the relevant departments to explain seasteading. They basically told us to @#% off.

    I agree that most people are not open to new ideas like this one, and more especialy Asian who are very conservative and cautious people.

    By the way, I’ve read something about the Sengkang project, I think it is a very promising one.

    Reise Laender World

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