1. Skip to navigation
  2. Skip to content
  3. Skip to sidebar




Seaweed bricks

Home Forums Archive TSI Engineering Seaweed bricks

This topic contains 3 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by Avatar of Alan Alan 3 years, 8 months ago.

Viewing 4 posts - 1 through 4 (of 4 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #1352
    Avatar of tusavision
    tusavision
    Participant

    You’ve got more wool, clay and seaweed than you know what to do with. Here’s a solution: Make really strong bricks.

    Researchers in Spain and Scotland say they’ve done just that.

    In experiments conducted at the University of Seville in Spain and the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow, Scotland, researchers added wool fibers to the claylike soil used to make bricks, then threw in alginate conglomerate, a polymer made from seaweed, according to a study published in the journal Construction and Building Materials.

    The bricks with wool were 37 percent stronger than conventional bricks and were more resistant to cracks and fissure, the researchers reported. Wool bricks are also energy savers as they’re made without firing, they said.

    “This is a more sustainable and healthy alternative to conventional building materials such as baked earth bricks and concrete blocks,” the study’s authors, Carmen Galán and Carlos Rivera, said.

    The bricks aren’t going to force anyone to give up their kilts or sweaters. Scotland’s sheep farmers produce more wool than its textile industry can use, the researchers say.

    http://news.blogs.cnn.com/2010/10/05/seaweed-wool-make-traditional-bricks-tougher/?hpt=T2

    #11503
    Avatar of Farmer
    Farmer
    Participant

    “polymer made from seaweed” is a detail I want to know more about.

    #11523
    Avatar of Thorizan
    Thorizan
    Participant

    I did some research on this earlier… the abstract shows that the compression strength is still a great deal less then that of firing the bricks.

    __________________________________________________
    There is no fate but what we make for ourselves. Each to his fate.

    #11757
    Avatar of Alan
    Alan
    Participant

    Thorizan wrote:

    I did some research on this earlier… the abstract shows that the compression strength is still a great deal less then that of firing the bricks.

    Compression strength isn’t everything. Most buildings don’t use anything like the full compression strength of brick. How do these bricks compare for regular wear and tear?

    That said, these bricks may be useful for cladding or small projects, but I’m doubtful what good they are otherwise – especially for a seastead.

    More info on the polymer made from seaweed however, might be useful.

Viewing 4 posts - 1 through 4 (of 4 total)

The forum ‘TSI Engineering’ is closed to new topics and replies.



Posted on at

Categories:

Written by

Blog/Newsletter

Donate