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Question(s) about Ferrocement

Home Forums Research Engineering Question(s) about Ferrocement

This topic contains 5 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by Avatar of icylazare icylazare 2 years, 5 months ago.

Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
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  • #1527
    Avatar of Terraformer
    Terraformer
    Participant

    Does ferrocement act as a coating capable of keeping out water, so that we can use other materials which wouldn’t hold up as well under the conditions of the sea, for example steel? Would a steel boat with a 0.5cm, say, layer of ferrocement last as long as a full ferrocement boat, due to the ferrocement protecting the steel from the sea water; if not, would it last longer than a steel boat without such protection? What if we put a plastic sheeting between the steel and the ferrocement – say, we take a metal boat, coat it in plastic for waterproofing, and then coat it in ferrocement? Would we be able to use materials such as wood for the structure?

    #13791
    Avatar of J.L.-Frusha
    J.L.-Frusha
    Participant

    Ferrocement is structural. It might be able to be applied to the exterior of a wooden vessel, but you’d still get dry-rot problems from moisture penetrating the wood and condensing between the wood and cement. Its’ main attraction is availability, low cost and relative ease of use (amateurs can often build with ferrocoement, it’s much like plastering). An alternative is Shot-crete/Gunnite/Spraycrete, which is pumped through a line a sprayed into place, then smoothed… The difference is the cost in tooling, which, if used multiple times, the gunnite equipment will pay for itself in time saved, over several vessels/structures.

    Later,

    J.L.F.

    Never be afraid to try something new…

    Remember, amateurs built the ark, professionals built the Titanic.

    #13792
    Avatar of Terraformer
    Terraformer
    Participant

    Can it protect, say, a metal vessel from the effects of seawater?

    How does the moisture get into the wood; I take it ferrocement is not impermeable? What if the wooden (or metal) structure was coated with plastic first, to create an impermeable layer?

    ____________________________________________________________________________

    Seasteading is to Boat Living what Traction Cities are to Vandwelling – simply a matter of scale.

    #13816
    Avatar of J.L.-Frusha
    J.L.-Frusha
    Participant

    Wood is porous, so water vapor and water in the bilge will get into the wood, along with microbes that eat wood…

    Using cement to coat a steel hull may well be cost prohibitive. The cheapest hull, of the 3 (wood, steel, ferrocement), tho make depends on the area, but there are examples of ferrocement hulls still in use from both World Wars, so I think from that perspective, the cost, amortized over time puts Ferrocement in the lead by many leagues… Add that a Ferrocement structure can be built at home, depending on size and space available, by amateur builders, as funds are available, really increases that lead…

    A ferrocement boat should be properly designed and the Ferro part should be put together properly, to prevent problems. There are people capable of this and they can be found through the internet.

    Later,

    J.L.F.

    Never be afraid to try something new…

    Remember, amateurs built the ark, professionals built the Titanic.

    #15143
    Avatar of GShydroman
    GShydroman
    Participant

    Terraformer wrote:

    Can it protect, say, a metal vessel from the effects of seawater?

    How does the moisture get into the wood; I take it ferrocement is not impermeable? What if the wooden (or metal) structure was coated with plastic first, to create an impermeable layer?

    ____________________________________________________________________________

    The Concrete at sufficient PSI strength is water tight. You just need to have a 5,000 PSI mix that Shotcrete or Gunite would provide. I’m sure they make waterproofing add mixtures to make it even better for moisture intrusion. The water actually makes it stronger over time as the concrete continues to cure for 30 years due to the Hydration Process which is what it is technically called. Wood / Steel shell is not really needed to achieve a watertight hull design. You can epoxy the outside but it is really expensive to do so. Remember just the humidity at sea is very high and wood will rot unless it is kept dry, steel will rust.

    Concrete structures built 2000 years ago still exist underwater in the Med. Sea. and that Concrete was actually placed in the water and subsiquently cured to form sea walls and harbors by the Romans. It’s call Hydrolic Concrete.

    #16252
    Avatar of icylazare
    icylazare
    Participant

    Hi all,

    Here is our massive problem. We have bought a Marsh Mist, which is steel hull 7 years ago . She was originaly a passager boat on the Queen Mary, We did a a lot of work on her to make it a liveaboard. We love her, but the last time she was repalated they did it in 3 mm steel . The whole hull is now thin as hell. we did a survey today we was told to basicly cut her up!!!! We are in the UK and I was looking at Ferrious Concrete over”plating” No one have have any expirience with this anymore. I need your feedbacks/helps…We don’t want to let her go…

    Any help advice even if harsh is welcome

    Icy

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