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Quantitative Analysis

Home Forums Archive TSI Engineering Quantitative Analysis

This topic contains 4 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of tusavision tusavision 3 years, 11 months ago.

Viewing 5 posts - 1 through 5 (of 5 total)
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  • #1441
    Profile photo of shredder7753
    shredder7753
    Participant

    Hey ALL,

    I think its time we can stop throwing mud pies – okay maybe a few more mud pies – but i think its time we should develop empirical data points for each design concept and place them in a spreadsheet on the wiki. Your thoughts?

    Rich

    #12366
    Profile photo of tusavision
    tusavision
    Participant

    Ok, get to it chief.

    I hope you put a lot of effort in to it. It’ll make it that much funnier when I put you to shame.

    #12370
    Profile photo of elspru
    elspru
    Participant

    shredder7753 wrote:

    Hey ALL,

    i think its time we should develop empirical data points for each design concept

    what do you mean? volume, materials, surface area?

    and place them in a spreadsheet on the wiki. Your thoughts?

    Rich

    feel free to add content to the wiki.

    well i found out that to have a ferrocement cube float with half over water, needs to be 18 times wider than hull thickness.

    tusavision wrote:

    Ok, get to it chief.

    I hope you put a lot of effort in to it. It’ll make it that much funnier when I put you to shame.

    shame on you.

    not being supportive of a new member.

    tsk tsk.

    remember for seasteading to happen,

    we have to attract members to want to seastead,

    by providing a polite, curteous, homey, family-like envrionment.

    calm aware desire choice love express intuit move

    #12372
    Profile photo of tusavision
    tusavision
    Participant

    elspru wrote:

    shredder7753 wrote:

    Hey ALL,

    i think its time we should develop empirical data points for each design concept

    what do you mean? volume, materials, surface area?

    and place them in a spreadsheet on the wiki. Your thoughts?

    Rich

    feel free to add content to the wiki.

    well i found out that to have a ferrocement cube float with half over water, needs to be 18 times wider than hull thickness.

    tusavision wrote:

    Ok, get to it chief.

    I hope you put a lot of effort in to it. It’ll make it that much funnier when I put you to shame.

    shame on you.

    not being supportive of a new member.

    tsk tsk.

    remember for seasteading to happen,

    we have to attract members to want to seastead,

    by providing a polite, curteous, homey, family-like envrionment.

    calm aware desire choice love express intuit move

    [/quote]


    Check out his other thread and the polite and courteous post he made out to W. Elmer.

    Personally, I think he’s either trolling, or totally oblivious at how ineffective he is at persuasion.

    Frankly, the idea expressed in this thread isn’t half bad. Free floating buoy accelerometers/NOAA wave data could be cross-referenced with accelerometer data from the living space of “model” structures to demonstrate a sufficient dampening effect. Which is why I suggested in a less than tactful way that he lead by example.

    You can do this in a bath tub. Hell: anyone of us writing right now could go to the dollar store, pick up some ping pong balls, propane tanks, shish kabob sticks, popsicle sticks, some epoxy putty, super glue, fishing line and some skinny animal balloons and do what he’s suggesting with no more than a bluetooth capable laptop and a wii-mote.

    I think it’s nice to back up ideas with data as a learning excercise, but I don’t need an accelerometer to tell me it’s more difficult to seastead the surface than the depths.

    If I was forced in to it, I would gimbal my platform, use eden project style geospheres to prevent the platform from catching the wind, and I would minimize my exposure to waves by raising myself high from the water on a tensegrity/tensairity structure that limited surface area exposure at wave height.

    Even then, I would still have an “oh shit” bug-out-vessel to deal with the once every 10 year waves.

    Kevlar vests stop bullets by absorbing the energy. Fighting waves with rigid structures is a losing battle. It’s the least elegant solution and is comparable to throwing money at the problem.

    That’s the nice thing about “Flip” and spar structures, by keeping the center of balance below the buoyancy, the structure is as stable as a weeble wobble.

    Put a gimbal on top and forget about it.

    #12373
    Profile photo of tusavision
    tusavision
    Participant

    tusavision wrote:

    elspru wrote:

    shredder7753 wrote:

    Hey ALL,

    i think its time we should develop empirical data points for each design concept

    what do you mean? volume, materials, surface area?

    and place them in a spreadsheet on the wiki. Your thoughts?

    Rich

    feel free to add content to the wiki.

    well i found out that to have a ferrocement cube float with half over water, needs to be 18 times wider than hull thickness.

    tusavision wrote:

    Ok, get to it chief.

    I hope you put a lot of effort in to it. It’ll make it that much funnier when I put you to shame.

    shame on you.

    not being supportive of a new member.

    tsk tsk.

    remember for seasteading to happen,

    we have to attract members to want to seastead,

    by providing a polite, curteous, homey, family-like envrionment.

    calm aware desire choice love express intuit move

    [/quote]


    Check out his other thread and the polite and courteous post he made out to W. Elmer.

    Personally, I think he’s either trolling, or totally oblivious at how ineffective he is at persuasion.

    Frankly, the idea expressed in this thread isn’t half bad. Free floating buoy accelerometers/NOAA wave data could be cross-referenced with accelerometer data from the living space of “model” structures to demonstrate a sufficient dampening effect. Which is why I suggested in a less than tactful way that he lead by example.

    You can do this in a bath tub. Hell: anyone of us writing right now could go to the dollar store, pick up some ping pong balls, propane tanks, shish kabob sticks, popsicle sticks, some epoxy putty, super glue, fishing line and some skinny animal balloons and do what he’s suggesting with no more than a bluetooth capable laptop and a wii-mote.

    I think it’s nice to back up ideas with data as a learning excercise, but I don’t need an accelerometer to tell me it’s more difficult to seastead the surface than the depths.

    If I was forced in to it, I would gimbal my platform, use eden project style geospheres to prevent the platform from catching the wind, and I would minimize my exposure to waves by raising myself high from the water on a tensegrity/tensairity structure that limited surface area exposure at wave height.

    Even then, I would still have an “oh shit” bug-out-vessel to deal with the once every 10 year waves.

    Kevlar vests stop bullets by absorbing the energy. Fighting waves with rigid structures is a losing battle. It’s the least elegant solution and is comparable to throwing money at the problem.

    That’s the nice thing about “Flip” and spar structures, by keeping the center of balance below the buoyancy, the structure is as stable as a weeble wobble.

    Put a gimbal on top and forget about it.

    [/quote]

    Why not just put that same gimbal inside a giant hamster ball water wheel?

    Because the pressure requirements for your hamster ball to survive waves crashing over it are virtually identical to the pressures necessary for a submersible structure to withstand. It’s either a submersible structure as is, or it is under engineered for the requirements and therefore a death trap.

    Why not make the hamster ball out of mesh like chicken wire?

    Because suddenly, your living space is very restrictive about it’s contents. Humans don’t live exclusively with things which are mesh or bolted to the floor. They live in nests full of head injuries in the making. Just look at tornados. Air is a fluid just as much as water.

    Sure, you can create durable chicken wire structures, but they aren’t living spaces because their contents will look like the interior of a washing machine when a wave hits it.

    If you want a place to play football, use milk crates to make a “porch” for your living structure, and fill it with balloons on a calm day.

    What about escape blimps/helicopters/aircraft?

    Unfortunately, the same weather conditions which make ships dangerous are equally bad for aircraft.

    What about escape submarines?

    Holy Crap! That sounds exactly like the direction popular opinion has been moving towards for months. I wonder why?

    Besides tradition, I’m not sure why floors are preferred over dive scooters and other forms of transport anyway. Given a proper wave break harbour, you can “jetsons chair” around a very large platform(called sea level) like you’re living in a beverly hills swimming pool. Floating lawnchair anyone?

    I think I’m going to make a thread about it.

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