1. Skip to navigation
  2. Skip to content
  3. Skip to sidebar




Pacific Garbage Patch as favorable location.

Home Forums Archive TSI Research Pacific Garbage Patch as favorable location.

This topic contains 7 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by Avatar of Alan Alan 3 years, 4 months ago.

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #1267
    Avatar of livefreeortry
    livefreeortry
    Participant

    As Eelco has mentioned in his research on wave and wind drift forces, station keeping can be a prohibitively expensive procedure. This led me to wonder whether there are locations in the open oceans where the waves and winds are in such a configuration that a seastead can expect relatively calm water for most of the year, or where a seastead would go round in relatively small circles.

    This reminded me of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, which forms because the plastic debris naturally collects in waters which are relatively calm and where wave and wind forces tend to concentrate floating objects. ..See the wikipedia link http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Pacific_Garbage_Patch

    A quote from the article:

    ” The garbage patch occupies a large and relatively stationary region of the North Pacific Ocean bound by the North Pacific Gyre “

    The region is conveniently off California, and the plastic debris is mostly microscopic and unobtrusive.

    I presume there must be several such locations world-wide where currents and winds would drive floating objects like seasteads in relatively manageable circles, so station keeping requirements would be minimized. Thoughts?

    #10325
    Avatar of wohl1917
    wohl1917
    Participant

    a very attractive idea most of these Gyre’s are off the beaten path so to speak. If one just wanted to drift and live it would be OK but economics is all about location, location, location! On the other, other hand you could make money picking up trash and recycling it, you’d be in the perfect location…

    < http://ocr.wikia.com/wiki/Oceanic_Citizens_Republic_Wiki>

    Avatar of elspru
    elspru
    Participant

    As Eelco has mentioned in his research on wave and wind drift forces, station keeping can be a prohibitively expensive procedure. This led me to wonder whether there are locations in the open oceans where the waves and winds are in such a configuration that a seastead can expect relatively calm water for most of the year, or where a seastead would go round in relatively small circles.

    This reminded me of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, which forms because the plastic debris naturally collects in waters which are relatively calm and where wave and wind forces tend to concentrate floating objects. ..See the wikipedia link http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Pacific_Garbage_Patch

    A quote from the article:

    ” The garbage patch occupies a large and relatively stationary region of the North Pacific Ocean bound by the North Pacific Gyre “

    The region is conveniently off California, and the plastic debris is mostly microscopic and unobtrusive.

    I presume there must be several such locations world-wide where currents and winds would drive floating objects like seasteads in relatively manageable circles, so station keeping requirements would be minimized. Thoughts?

    Ya, quite interesting, reminds me of the alien prediction thread

    “there was only gonna be one government, on the planet earth,

    and they’ll be living on some sort of artificial island,

    it’s gonna be floating in the middle of a dark black dirty sea”

    http://seasteading.org/interact/forums/community/dreaming-/-crazy-ideas-/-speculation/aliens-predict-floating-island

    the pacific can look pretty dark,

    and pacific garbage patch can certainly classify as dirty.

    wohl1917 wrote:

    a very attractive idea most of these Gyre’s are off the beaten path so to speak. If one just wanted to drift and live it would be OK but economics is all about location, location, location! On the other, other hand you could make money picking up trash and recycling it, you’d be in the perfect location…

    < http://ocr.wikia.com/wiki/Oceanic_Citizens_Republic_Wiki>

    ya for sure.

    can recycle the plastic and make boats out of it.

    or at least use it as filler for cement,

    would help with floation.

    calm aware desire choice love express intuit move

    Avatar of xns
    xns
    Participant

    Gyres in general are favourable areas to “set up shop” in. As I see it, there are 2 distinct options, you can moor a seastead on the edge of the gyre where the current is strongest and use that for generating energy and/or aquaculture. Not to mention awesome surfing if you had a beach built =D It would also help keep the seastead in a nice stable position since the current is coming from only one direction.

    On the other end of the current spectrum, you’d have seasteads using dynamic positioning systems to just drift around in the middle of the gyre, Though personally, I can’t imagine how you’d do business with another entity if your address kept changing every 6 hours.

    King Shannon of the Constitutional Monarchy of Logos.

    #10650
    Avatar of J.L.-Frusha
    J.L.-Frusha
    Participant

    Dependind on the situation, a gyre should be somewhat lower, in station-keeping needs. As for keeping in touch, yachts and big ships use satellite tracking, to do just that, as do RVs… It’s already available technology. Might consider choosing a gyre, based on satellite coverage…

    Later,

    J.L.F.

    Never be afraid to try something new…

    Remember, amateurs built the ark, professionals built the Titanic.

    #10661
    Avatar of Farmer
    Farmer
    Participant

    There are 5 ocean gyres. There would be six but Antarctica is in the middle of one The ecosystem it the gyres is very sparse; described as a marine desert. That is not the plastic’s fault; it’s because the being so far from shore the mineral nutrients are very rare. Most life is unicellular and there is almost no animal life. We would change all this by exchanging the current polymers for something more digestible but it will be a very poor place for fishing even then.
    #10691
    Avatar of elspru
    elspru
    Participant

    Farmer wrote:

    There are 5 ocean gyres. There would be six but Antarctica is in the middle of one The ecosystem it the gyres is very sparse; described as a marine desert. That is not the plastic’s fault; it’s because the being so far from shore the mineral nutrients are very rare. Most life is unicellular and there is almost no animal life. We would change all this by exchanging the current polymers for something more digestible but it will be a very poor place for fishing even then.

    Halleluia!

    We can add nutrients to the water.

    For instance can add in tiny iron oxide particles,

    it’s an effect of electrolysis with iron.

    Also a major source can be from steel mills.

    A seasteading confernce participant mentioned

    using tons of the micro iron particles,

    they suspeneded in the ocean for prolonged periods of time,

    so could take months to sink, thereby being bioavailable

    as food for algae to grow much longer.

    This can promote Algal blooms, which create food for fish,

    we can then farm fish by bringing them to eat the algae.

    We can also harvest the algae directly and eat it.

    Can also harvest the floating plastic to use as cement filler,

    the cement itself can be from seashells calcium carbonate.

    calm aware desire choice love express intuit move

    #11930
    Avatar of Alan
    Alan
    Participant

    Another possibility for the garbage in the oceans:

    http://pesn.com/2010/11/20/9501729_Green_Power_Inc_launching_MSW-to-fuel_plant_manufacturing/

    Of course, collecting the material will likely not be cost-effective, but perhaps there would be parties willing to clean it up, and this represents one thing that could be done with the waste.

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)

The forum ‘TSI Research’ is closed to new topics and replies.



Posted on at

Categories:

Written by

Blog/Newsletter

Donate