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Oceanstead Development International (OSDI)

Home Forums Community General Chat Oceanstead Development International (OSDI)

This topic contains 79 replies, has 19 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of xiagos xiagos 4 years, 9 months ago.

Viewing 5 posts - 76 through 80 (of 80 total)
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  • #9496
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    I like the new idea, although it won’t do what I want to do… It has many more possibilities than the other version. Maybe we could put heads together, rather than butting them(my fault). I’m a bit OCD about the ‘what-ifs,’ ‘wheres,’ ‘whys,’ and ‘hows.’

    In the long-haul, after I get to the point I have to slow-down, I could see getting an improved model… Gotta go into semi-retirement sometime, LOL.

    Later,

    J.L..F.

    If you can’t swim with the big fish, stick to the reef

    #9497
    Profile photo of elspru
    elspru
    Participant

    OCEANOPOLIS wrote:

    I think that OCEANFLOAT meets most of the seasteading requirements that a majority of us here agreed upon:

    1. Ferrocement construction. (to be more precise, steel reeinforced concrete).
    2. Modular.
    3. Mobile.
    4. Scalable.
    5. Safe & Stable and Comfortable. (due to the high beam to length ratio).
    6. Easily accessible by boat for cargo or passanger transfer.
    7. Variable draft.

    The Modular Island engineering thread is quite interesting and related.

    A simpler design such as a flatter version of

    can have much lower production costs,

    and much better volume to surface area ratio,

    it’s also highly modular

    can also form the shape of the “ocean float”.

    for geometric balancing it simply needs to be wider than it is tall,

    I recommend phi times wider than it is tall.

    this is a pure seastead home, and can be towed by a sail boat.

    then several of them can be interconnected on the high seas,

    a bunch of them could be ferrocemented together to form floating islands,

    eventually could even have mountains on them to collect clouds.

    #9499
    Profile photo of OCEANOPOLIS
    OCEANOPOLIS
    Participant

    But,…(its always a but, lol), you will be losing valuable space using this floats, because the tanks, engines, storage areas, etc will have to be positioned ON the modules, not INSIDE as with the conventional ferrocement hull of the OCEANFLOAT. I do agree that these floats will be cheaper to produce, as is the case with Magicfloat or Candock, but if you have to ferrocement the whole structure, than the whole process will become more expensive than building just the ferro hull alone.

    #9512
    Profile photo of elspru
    elspru
    Participant

    OCEANOPOLIS wrote:

    But,…(its always a but, lol), you will be losing valuable space using this floats, because the tanks, engines, storage areas, etc will have to be positioned ON the modules, not INSIDE as with the conventional ferrocement hull of the OCEANFLOAT. I do agree that these floats will be cheaper to produce, as is the case with Magicfloat or Candock, but if you have to ferrocement the whole structure, than the whole process will become more expensive than building just the ferro hull alone.

    Actually each indivdual module is a house boat,

    with a cieling at 206 cm,

    floor area on main floor is 53m^2 or 570 ft^2

    including top and bottom floor it’s about a 1000 ft^2 floor space.

    I was thinking of having just the hull and support beams of ferro-cement.

    Also should be easier than hartley construction, since can use straight structural steel beams.

    #9857
    Profile photo of xiagos
    xiagos
    Participant

    thief wrote:

    I understand that everything needs to be recycled on boats, and that human waste makes excellent fertilizer, but I just don’t think I can bring myself to eat crap-cultivated-crops. I’ll buy my fertilizer from the shore. :P

    - Nick

    ———————————————————————————————————————————————————-

    Sorry to bust your bubble Nick, but you don’t know much about farming. I especially hope you don’t eat organic. Lots of farm land is fertilized with sludge from waste treatment plants, and from the lagoons used at feed lots to consolidate manure from milk cows, pigs, chickens, etc. Unless you’ve been growing your own food, chances are you’ve been eating good, wholesome crap-cultivated all your life. Put hair on your chest, didn’t it?

    X

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