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Jack-up rigs

Home Forums Research Engineering Jack-up rigs

This topic contains 33 replies, has 10 voices, and was last updated by Avatar of wohl1917 wohl1917 2 years, 11 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 34 total)
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  • #1591
    Avatar of esobofh
    esobofh
    Participant

    Anyone have any idea what the lifespan of a jack-up rig is? Cost?

    Seems to be a tonne of them for sale online… seems like a logical place to start in building a seastead.

    Can be placed in 300 ft of water, and moved wherever you like!

    #14731
    Avatar of esobofh
    esobofh
    Participant

    this specific one mentions living quarters for 100, and a hospital – nifty!

    #14735
    Avatar of Ellen-Re-Generate
    Ellen-Re-Generate
    Participant

    Link?

    I have a thorium reactor under the hood of my car. I get ∞ miles per gallon.

    #14751
    Avatar of xns
    xns
    Participant

    I’d imagine you could just contact the engineering people over at Maersk or BP, they’re quite friendly and willing to jump in on crazy discussions, based off the responses I got from the ones in Singapore anyway.

    King Shannon of the Constitutional Monarchy of Logos.

    #15108
    Avatar of defied
    defied
    Participant

    Let’s keep in mind that all of these platforms will require annual inspections. In the Gulf, as a commercial diver, I was responsible for NDT (Non destructive Testing) of Jack up rigs every year to ensure there was no corrosion, or material breakdown that could harm lives.

    I don’t think “Lifespan” is an appropriate question, as much as “Service-ability and costs” would be. Less service will shorten the life span, more costs to the inspections will enhance it.

    IMHO, Jack up Rigs are outstanding base platforms for a SeaStead. You can lift one leg at a time for inspection, thus keeping the platform stable. The cost is up to your local OSHA rep. 0]

    I would be more interested in seeing artificial reef ideas. Re-bar and concrete may be a more viable format for longevity, and ease of maintenance. In light of recycling, jack up rigs are meant to be super stable for a long time.

    D

    #15127
    Avatar of georgeberz
    georgeberz
    Participant

    Jack up rigs cost tens of millions if not hundreds of millions of US Dollars, as for living space for 100+ think of it as racks and berths, not bedrooms, think bunk houses.

    I found a 3 yr old one was 220 million

    This type of real estate is expensive, once you divide it up by the possible people involved the cost per head is way off the charts.

    George – http://OutpostAlpha.com

    #15129
    Avatar of defied
    defied
    Participant

    I’m not sure if the idea of living in sovereign countries offshore was ever intended to be cheap.

    I’ve lived and worked on may a jack up rig. Living space is actually modular. I lived in what amounted to a construction trailer laid on top of the rig stacked three high.

    If you get rid of all of the drilling gear, and buld a series of condo’s, you could house a couple hundred comfortably. Of course, I imagine a seastead as a base with attachments, so for me, the top of the rig would be for the initial investors. You can link Jack up’s together, but overhead will continue to go up, obviously, or you could create floating islands.

    I imagine, to do it cheaper, you would commission the build of a new one, or you would buy one, strip it down, and sell off the parts to cover costs. I guess finding the dimensions, and deck levels would be ideal before making any further assumptions.

    D

    #15130
    Avatar of georgeberz
    georgeberz
    Participant

    So did 100+ people have each thier own private rooms or were you bunked up 3-4 per room? Im sure they were not luxury condos… so more bunkhouse or condo?

    Funny I’ve always though of seasteading as kinda akin to homesteading, staking aout a piece of dirt/sea for free or nearly free and building someithing on it with your own two hands… living off the land / sea

    so is seasteading a common mans dream or only a business proposal for the mega rich..? what are you proposing on a per unit basis? how many sq’ woudl you get?

    Im lost please correct my observations

    George

    #15131
    Avatar of defied
    defied
    Participant

    Of course not, there were six men to a trailer. Let’s set this up though. I will explain more below.

    If you’re personally homesteading, and want to live off of the sea, and not pay money for anything, then you’re not taking out a jack up rig. It can’t be afforded as stated earlier.

    So is seasteading a common mans dream or only a business proposal for the mega rich..? what are you proposing on a per unit basis? how many sq’ woudl you get?

    Im lost please correct my observations

    George

    Great questions, George!

    Looking at purchasing a Jack up rig to perform this instance of sea stedding, it MUST be viewed as a business in order to maintain the upkeep and quality of the rig.

    Now for an explanation (The way I see this discussion):

    Let’s take a jack up rig example; The Spartan Gladiator:

    The gladiator has over 17,000sf of usable deck space. If we want 100 people to share this deck space horizontally, each individual would be allotted 170square feet. Now, we need room for restaraunts, farms, etc, so obviously that wouldn’t happen. Let’s take 30 percent of property and apply it to community areas.

    This now gives us what, 11,900SqFt? 119sqft per person if we maintain the 100 person capacity. 5100SqFt for common areas/shops/walkways/etc.

    Now, please allow me to build up. The reason I chose the gladiator is because it is a 4 point rig, allowing for some of the best stability you will find in water depths of 250fsw (Let’s say we want to be super safe, so we keep it to 100. This actually allows us more space on the bottom for engineering (in my perfect stead).

    So if I build up 5 decks, at lets say, 10ft open area, approx 2-3ft of flooring, insulation,ceiling, etc, comes to around 65ft vertical height. More than easily supported by the rig spacing (Keeping a low enough center of gravity for stability), I now have 595squFt per person! That’s a studio apartment.

    595 SqFt per person is outstanding. A 3 person family could effectively have 1785 SqFt to themselves!!! That’s as big as my 1911 Craftsman the my wife, youngest child, and dog reside in!

    At that point, you would also have 25,500SqFt of community area. Paths, taverns, library, jail, police, whatever you want can happen.

    And this is just on deck! Imagine what kind of generators, and communications devices you can hang off of the rigging. In the interior section of the rig, you can house small apartments, and engineering /command/control spaces.

    We’re not even talking about laying out slips for people to park their boats that they can live aboard.

    Living at sea in a community has to have some form of business aspect to it in order to maintain funding for the upkeep of the entire community (primarily, avoiding the sinking ship).

    So, let’s say we can get that rig for oh, 400Million. For 100 people, that would be 4mil a pop for the people living on the decks. If we tie in slips and moorage, we can charge a little less. That’s effectively 112,000/yr for 36 years per person.

    That’s not including the leasing of the community spaces. If there are “businesses” that would prefer to operate offshore, then that could be a super beneficial income that could offset the costs of the community.

    Boat is bought. What about upkeep? Now we need to bring in some sort of revenue to upkeep the stead. How do we do that? Taxes. Yup.. I said it… Taxes.

    Why taxes? Businesses and people can come and go, but taxes are guaranteed across the board. Home values can go up or down, and taxes can be adjusted accordingly, but revenue is vital to upkeep such a complex vehicle.

    If you don’t want to work this angle, then using the community to build a location would be far more beneficial. You can create a seamount, create a wave wall that could also be a tidal generator for electricity, etc, with the hands of many intelligent, like minded individuals. Pour your own land, recycle the plastic ocean in to buoyancy devices, etc.

    So please keep in mind, this is what I see of a seastead if you were to purchase a rig and create homes. This is also on the fly, as I’m at work. I can’t really figure out the in depth details, and I like to focus more on the power generation details, so I’m not fully on track. If we want to have a more involved discussion, I am more than happy to sit down, and noodle out all of the details. I love these conversations, because it allows you to fine tune everything you’re thinking of.

    Once again, Great Questions!

    Thanks,

    D

    #15137
    Avatar of defied
    defied
    Participant

    I would recommend a Jack up Barge for Sea Steading. It’s a boat, that has legs, and it could fit a couple of families who could EASILY afford it, and you can easily move it wherever you want to go.

    #15138

    we had in the TSI engineering report that anything (ships, barges, oilrigs) that is built from steel plating and in traditional shipbuilding and naval engineering techniques passes what is acceptable for “housing purpose” a factor 10 or even a factor 100.

    Most critical is not the building cost or purchase cost – we all know that you can get that marine steel structures after their service life is over, at scrap metal prices or just for taking the problem out of sight of the owner for free.

    The reason why there is no second life as housing unit, is the maintenance cost. A family can only pay a maintenance costs compareable to house or apartmant maintenance cost which is a factor 100 or 1000 away from what oil/gas/ship industry has to budget for their structures.

    What i see here is a steel barge with a lot of ADDITIONAL mechanics even more expensive to maintain than a normal barge. If a normal barge is already way too expensive – how is this supposed to work? – only if nobody does the numbers correctly – i assume…

    There are SOLID maintenance cost reason why nobody is actually housing on abandoned barges, ships, and rigs -

    For enable seasteading you can not take a traditional industrial marine steel concept and tweak it a bit to make it work as a housing unit. You need a float that has a maintenance free service life of hundred(s) of years – capeable to work as “real estate” investment.

    #15139
    Avatar of defied
    defied
    Participant

    That’s exactly why I stated earlier that it’s really not cost beneficial. Tying up a series of Grand Banks, and forming a “community” would be more cost beneficial. It’s a smaller boat to take care of, and depending on what materials were used in the building of, should last for quite some time, if properly taken care of.

    D

    #15177
    Avatar of shredder7753
    shredder7753
    Participant

    even a ‘Grand Banks‘ or other type of yacht is going to be WAY to expensive for 99% of people to A) purchase, B) fuel, C) maintain. AND there’s that little tiny problem of what do u do in a hurricane? not to mention the darn things rocks like crazy ALL day Every day on the surface.

    most people dont have such a ‘great bank’. if it was that simple to seastead people wuldnt pay so much for dock fees.

    ____________

    My Work II

    “Leadership and do-ership are not the same thing”

    #15186
    Avatar of defied
    defied
    Participant

    shredder7753 wrote:

    even a ‘Grand Banks‘ or other type of yacht is going to be WAY to expensive for 99% of people to A) purchase, B) fuel, C) maintain. AND there’s that little tiny problem of what do u do in a hurricane? not to mention the darn things rocks like crazy ALL day Every day on the surface.

    most people dont have such a ‘great bank’. if it was that simple to seastead people wuldnt pay so much for dock fees.

    ____________

    My Work II

    “Leadership and do-ership are not the same thing”

    A Grand Banks can go for 30K and up. 1/8 the cost of a house these days. If you can’t afford 30K to move offshore, then good luck affording property in a micro government. Hell, good luck buying the mud/sticks/concrete you’re going to use to build your island/floating rigamaroo. All of that material has to come from somewhere, and unless you have the equipment to mine the ocean floor, you’ll be collecting it from some government owned land or another. 0]

    As far as Hurricanes go, don’t move to a heavily affected location.

    I recommended Grand banks because they rock the least out of all of the trawlers. Any large boat would work. Buy one and build it up. I’ve seen trawlers going for a couple grand, you just need to perform near full rebuilds.

    If you have a large community, you can moor up. You won’t need to waste too much fuel, especially if you rock wind, and solar panels.

    Show me a model where you can live offshore in a seastead for less than 30K, and survive beyond a year. Living on water for long durations will require a significant feat of engineering, maintenance, and dedication. You’re bulding a solid surface in the middle of the ocean (aka: a flat surface with no mountains to block the wind). Expect hardship, rough weather, etc. There are landlubbers, and there are sailors.

    #15192
    Avatar of shredder7753
    shredder7753
    Participant

    all right now im ready to call out you and Ellmer…

    there’s a quantitative measure that you dont seem to have consideration for. i was born during the day but it wasnt yesterday. please dont make a small slice of the argument and pretend there’s nothing else to it. a $30K GB is not going to be comfortable in anything but calm waters. what u gonna do when the ocean swells are 40′ high? what is the average maintence cost per year if spread out over 25 years? what is the cost of electric per KW/h? how many square feet are you giving per person?

    your so far from realistic i cant even…

    ____________

    My Work II

    “Leadership and do-ership are not the same thing”

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