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This topic contains 114 replies, has 27 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of nagydani nagydani 4 years, 1 month ago.

Viewing 10 posts - 106 through 115 (of 115 total)
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  • #11746
    Profile photo of nagydani
    nagydani
    Participant

    As promised, here‘s the first installment of a more detailed report, complete with photos.

    NEC Pasolink Neo on my roof

    #11762
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    Great system specs. How much does it cost?

    I read your installation report and ePoint. ePoint is a great find, being able to flash the admin, captive portal, and payment right into cheap, commonly available routers like the Linksys WRT series. from your Google sat image, it looks like you have plenty of buildings to expand your business into. Have you looked at powerline ethernet adapters ( http://www.netgear.com/products/home/powerline-and-coax/work-and-play/default.aspx )? I’ve used these in buildings where wireless doesn’t work well. One had metal lath, so 802.11 would only work in one room. They need to be on the same transformer and phase leg of the wiring to work, but have been very reliable where I’ve used them. It’d be nice to port ePoint over to this system, but they could tie into a master DHCP router flashed with ePoint. Doesn’t seem like every remote access point would need ePoint, just the one with DHCP and the WAN uplink.

    #11764
    Profile photo of i_is_j_smith
    i_is_j_smith
    Participant

    Intel has been working on a long-haul WiFi solution for a few years now, and there is now a commercial off-the-shelf product called the Rural Connectivity Platform (RCP). $500 gets you a radio that will do 6.5Mbps over 100km using 5-6W. It uses normal hardware but a highly modified 802.11 protocol. It can do straight point-to-point connections or relay configurations using extenders.

    Some links:

    http://blogs.intel.com/research/2008/03/rural_connectivity_platform_be.php

    http://www.dslreports.com/shownews/Intel-Tinkers-With-60-Mile-WiFi-92736

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8cyZVkxwf7Y

    Zcomax Technologies is a retailer of the RCP devices. http://www.zcomax.com/rcp.htm has everything you need.

    A base station on land, another base station on the seastead, and then two or three extenders on solar-powered aerostats will get you an excellent high-speed internet solution out to 300-400km for around $3000 (not including the aerostat cost).

    #11766
    Profile photo of nagydani
    nagydani
    Participant

    admiral wrote:
    Great system specs. How much does it cost?

    I don’t know how much the NEC backhaul equipment costs, because I am leasing it from the upstream ISP. Since it operates in licensed frequency bands, they don’t sell it to mere mortals. But my guesstimate is that it costs around 7 grand, including everything.

    admiral wrote:
    I read your installation report and ePoint. ePoint is a great find, being able to flash the admin, captive portal, and payment right into cheap, commonly available routers like the Linksys WRT series. from your Google sat image, it looks like you have plenty of buildings to expand your business into. Have you looked at powerline ethernet adapters ( http://www.netgear.com/products/home/powerline-and-coax/work-and-play/default.aspx )? I’ve used these in buildings where wireless doesn’t work well. One had metal lath, so 802.11 would only work in one room. They need to be on the same transformer and phase leg of the wiring to work, but have been very reliable where I’ve used them. It’d be nice to port ePoint over to this system, but they could tie into a master DHCP router flashed with ePoint. Doesn’t seem like every remote access point would need ePoint, just the one with DHCP and the WAN uplink.

    Given the price and the specs of powerline adapters, I’d go with a master DHCP router solution you suggest instead of trying to cram ePoint HotSpot firmware into the adapter. The architecture you propose is actually a very sensible one; over here I also use that configuration: Even though all the APs are flashed with ePoint HotSpot firmware, they are all configured into wired AP or WDS bridge mode (with one exception, of course). Thus, the network is a switched one with a single gateway/paywall. The firmware is capable of handling a network of HotSpots, each with its own uplink, but it is not the case here. On a seastead, people with their own connection (e.g. satellite) would be able to sell their access to others in case there is some problem with the regular backhaul.

    #11779
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    I’ve been wanting to set up a wireless ISP in a small island community in Texas which can’t currently get broadband service. This could work well, using the Zcomax system j smith mentioned, along with ePoint. 6.5 mbps might be insufficient for 19 households. I need to connect from the mainland to the island. It’d be nice to have the 100 mbps data rate of the NEC, but it sounds a lot more expensive. This could be a good test for a future Seastead link.

    #11783
    Profile photo of tusavision
    tusavision
    Participant

    Put a WRT54G in a blimp and slap on a solar panel and forget about it. The damn things are like $3 at Good Will.

    Teather it to an anchor

    It’s all just talk until someone builds a working network off the florida keys. I’ll present the first person to do that +5 internets.

    Oh wait. You’re seriousLet me laugh even harder.

    I’m not a troll… I’m you!

    #11838
    Profile photo of nagydani
    nagydani
    Participant

    admiral wrote:

    I’ve been wanting to set up a wireless ISP in a small island community in Texas which can’t currently get broadband service. This could work well, using the Zcomax system j smith mentioned, along with ePoint. 6.5 mbps might be insufficient for 19 households. I need to connect from the mainland to the island. It’d be nice to have the 100 mbps data rate of the NEC, but it sounds a lot more expensive. This could be a good test for a future Seastead link.

    Please let me know if you do that. I am really curious how it works out and willing to help with ePoint-related issues.

    #11843
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    That would be great. Can ePoint handle credit card transactions? The island has a popular beach, so there could also be an additional market from daytime visitors and beach vendors.

    #11848
    Profile photo of tusavision
    tusavision
    Participant

    tusavision wrote:

    Put a WRT54G in a blimp and slap on a solar panel and forget about it. The damn things are like $3 at Good Will.

    Teather it to an anchor

    It’s all just talk until someone builds a working network off the florida keys. I’ll present the first person to do that +5 internets.

    Oh wait. You’re seriousLet me laugh even harder.

    I’m not a troll… I’m you!

    I can’t believe I neglected to use the word “daisy chain” here. I’m losing my touch.

    Oh wait. You’re seriousLet me laugh even harder.

    I’m not a troll… I’m you!

    #11849
    Profile photo of nagydani
    nagydani
    Participant

    admiral wrote:

    That would be great. Can ePoint handle credit card transactions? The island has a popular beach, so there could also be an additional market from daytime visitors and beach vendors.

    In theory — yes. In practice, we haven’t set it up yet. The difficulty is that there is very little you can do in case of a chargeback, so you need to price in that risk. This, and the fees asked by CC companies and banks would mean that those who pay by CC would need to pay more than those who buy ePoint with cash.

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