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Intentional Community Components

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This topic contains 5 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by Avatar of Morganism Morganism 2 years, 11 months ago.

Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
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  • #1671
    Avatar of elspru
    elspru
    Participant

    Partially inspired by the SOBIZ thread, am starting this intentional community thread, for the generic components that have been proven, or you’d like to attempt. Please feel free to contribute your own intentional community package, or simply comment on one already posted.

    Here is a demonstrative example from myself:

    Intro

    During the back to the land movement, there were many intentional communities that formed,

    Those that were disorganized, typically disintegrated in chaos, with broken hearts and pockets.

    Some managed to thrive, those were the organized ones.

    At long lived intentional communities such as Twin Oaks, everyone works and average of 42 hours a week at the community. People can choose which occupations they work at, can go up rungs of skill level. Occupation areas include planning, product creation, packaging, marketing and delivery. They all live in the same (boat)house and share a (galley)kitchen, even with their turn over rate, they average about a 100 people membership.

    here is a clip of a fem that’s been a member for 3 years http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7jL7RgJdSqM

    Paperwork

    So various documents we may need to make regularly, include typically performing some business function.these were the organized ones, typically performing some business function.

    having a work calendar, where occupations are listed, and members can sign up for duties,

    then a worklog or invoice of work completed from each worker, so they can get their due.

    notices, permits and waivers, for modifcations to community property or procedures.

    The general scheme is that of a co-operative, where all members get returns based on their contributions.

    If people consume more than they produce and are a burden on the community they can be deported.

    Economy

    A persons invoice of services is their money, however they can deposit in their account in the community, and make paper notes with their signature, and noteID, which upon someone’s deposit, would upon verification withdraw from their account.

    This way people could both pay each other, and support other members of the community, potentially starting new ventures or offshoot communities.

    Products

    Considering that products are already made in the community, people could request custom items designed and created for them, paid by their currency. Depending on the location of the community in the world ocean, it may be cheaper to produce locally than the items associated shipping rates, which also requires a member or members of the community to go and get an item.

    Planning

    People that do “planning” for the community, at Twin Oaks are usually a group of three, though studies show up to seven can work, these can be volunteer or elected positions. One of the main functions is to survey the community for what is wished for, and to organize activtities to flow towards making the most wishes come true. While at the same time maintaining any long-term projects or activities.

    Governance

    Sociological studies show that a system of ranking is both the most accurate and resilient way of organizing hierarchies. So to build a ranking, each person, can vote on each other person, the amount of points that a person gets is their ranking. People should at least be allowed to vote yes (+1), no (-1) and maybe (0), though for more fun can allow a larger diversity of numbers.

    This way the leading members can be those of highest ranking, if they are for some reason unable to lead, then the next highest ranking person leads. To keep the rankings fluid, can vote on them once a year, at start of the down-season (i.e. winter solstice), that way people have time to settle into their new rank throughout the down-season so they’ll be ready for the up-season.

    Higher ranking people have right-of-way, so when comes time to selecting a job, they can select the one they like, unless positions are filled in by higher ranking persons. Generally speaking it would also work as in the military, where people of lower rank, should comply with the wishes of those with higher rank.

    Projects and Celebration

    Similarly project elections can be held bi annually on the equinoxes. Before elections, a native-american tradition may be appropriate such as potlatch though a more simply potluck party may also serve well. People that wish to get high ranking, either for themselves or their projects, can use this time to bribe other members with gifts and party fun. Incorporating community spirit into affairs.

    Lawfullness

    In terms of notices, permits and waivers, if we operate in the territory of another nation, it is common courtesy to send notice of intent, so terms can be negotiated over paper rather than having to get sticky. It’s also easier to probe for multiple potential destinations, if we mail them ahead of time.

    Not sure about other legal jurisdictions but in Common Law areas, if you send a notice, and give them sufficient time reply if they disagree, it can be used as lawful excuse to continue with the activity.

    Typically then this notice can be used as a permit, then people that participate in the activity, can sign waivers taking liability for their actions, or designating it to appropriate party such as a corporation.

    The intentional communites that managed to thrive were the organized ones.

    – Logan Streondj

    We with You are a Network, our goal to become technologically-enabled reproducible family communities. http://weyounet.info

    #15952
    Avatar of AlchemistGeorge
    AlchemistGeorge
    Participant

    I think the idea of looking at what has been done before, and what worked, is an excellent idea.

    However, I think that your statement: “The intentional communites that managed to thrive were the organized ones” is not as correct as you might like to think.

    You might want to check out the Lafayette Morehouse people. Their community has been together for 43+ years and as far as I can tell they’ve been a major influence on the California intentional community scene.

    They have two rules, one of which is ‘don’t do anything you don’t want to do.”

    Go figure.

    #15959
    Avatar of elspru
    elspru
    Participant

    I think the idea of looking at what has been done before, and what worked, is an excellent idea.

    However, I think that your statement: “The intentional communites that managed to thrive were the organized ones” is not as correct as you might like to think.

    You might want to check out the Lafayette Morehouse people. Their community has been together for 43+ years and as far as I can tell they’ve been a major influence on the California intentional community scene.

    They are still very organized, while the founder was alive, all the courses were about various forms of sexual pleasure. Now that his partner has taken over, it’s more about being happy and such.

    While I do agree that there is a place for physical bonding activities such as sexual, it is one of many elements to a successful community. The Morehouse project uses it as their lure and source of income, likely buying all the things they don’t create themselves. They’ve capitalized upon a niche, which in hypersexualized California has quite a large market.

    On a Seastead which is somewhat farther away from land, having high volumes of visitors for such niche topics is less likely. Though we could still have something like a bar or restaurant, more generic entertainment.

    However that still relies on a rather high volume of visitors, to develop Seasteads as autonomous nations, they’d have to be able to live without tourist dollars to fund them. Which includes making their own products and maintaining and recreating their own boats, typically from self-acquired resources.

    They have two rules, one of which is ‘don’t do anything you don’t want to do.”

    Go figure.

    Yes, that’s completely compliant with the constitution, list of abilities, http://www.seasteading.org/interact/forums/research/philosophy-and-law/a-constitution

    0. allowed to do nothing and 3 allowed to choose

    Even with the occuptions I described above, people volitionally sign up to projects they’d like to participate in, and do as much work as they like to do, their invoice (potentially co-signed by fellow activity participants) demonstrates how much they have contributed.

    We with You are a Network, our goal to become technologically-enabled reproducible family communities. http://weyounet.info

    #16092
    Avatar of AlchemistGeorge
    AlchemistGeorge
    Participant

    I don’t think I did a good job of making my point.

    Its not about the particular economy of the morehouse community. Their community business happens to be teaching courses that summarize their research on group living, but I heard the founder say (years ago) that it could have been any business they chose to do as a group.

    Personally I think that its not the buildings or the real estate or the technology or the contract that makes a community, it is fundamentally the on-going relationship among the people who live there. We all know how tricky it can be maintaining a relationship inside of a couple, let alone with eight other people. Or one hundred and fifty. Long term high quality relationships inside a group is (IMHO) what the Morehouse folks are good at, and that is why (I think) their group have lasted 40+ years when some staggering percentage of ICs last less than 5.

    I’m assuming an offshore community will be very much like a small island or a small ship. With little real estate – little elbow room – I’m guessing it has the potential to be a little bit of a pressure cooker – and the anonymity and freedom to ignore each other that people normally use to manage their relationships with others may not be present.

    Anyway, it was just a thought.

    
    
    

    #16111
    Avatar of Kaseijin
    Kaseijin
    Participant

    I’m assuming an offshore community will be very much like a small island or a small ship. With little real estate – little elbow room – I’m guessing it has the potential to be a little bit of a pressure cooker – and the anonymity and freedom to ignore each other that people normally use to manage their relationships with others may not be present.
    Hi!
    That could be a problem on a monolithic seastead, but if it’s modular you can change neighbourhood without leaving your house.
    At start tensions would be reduced by proximity to land and non-seasteaders, later by size of a seastead, choice of different seasteads and finally by people who move in for reasons other than their worldview.
    How much community work and shared resources is best for running a seastead is an open question until someone builds one.
    #16385
    Avatar of Morganism
    Morganism
    Participant

    But the friction would motivate you to work on, and finish your own section, so you could “move out”, even it it was a reconfiguration.

    Take away the standing of corporations – http://movetoamend.org/get-involved

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