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Hello from Uruguay

Home Forums Community Introductions Hello from Uruguay

This topic contains 15 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by Avatar of Matt Matt 3 years, 1 month ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 16 total)
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  • #1396
    Avatar of Matt
    Matt
    Participant

    Hello from Uruguay and Argentina!

    I joined a couple of years ago but never introduced myself, except in a probably misplaced topic. I’m 26, 3d drafter, studied Architecture and some Economics, right now trying to self-educate about Population Genetics. I give an enourmous importance to space and how we place our monkey human bodies; I want and will provide more options for us to live in different physical positions. Seating is so arbitrary, as are most cultural customs. I love the sea, ships, floating objects, and being in between different parameters: sandspits, beaches, rocks, edges of docks, roofs, cornices. I was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, but have engineered my late life to live most of the time in more Maritime (and both socially and economically freer) Uruguay, a tiny country in between the River Plate and Brazil.

    This is what I wrote about the subject of Seasteading. Please mind the spelling and grammar as I have still to learn to re-read my texts before posting. I would really like to have some honest, cruel if required, feedback on it: http://seasteading.org/interact/forums/research/tsi-research/matts-vision

    I extend a warm salute to all those freedom and ocean lovers out there.

    Matt

    #12013
    Avatar of elspru
    elspru
    Participant

    welcome to the forum,

    hope you enjoy your stay.

    What boating or sailing experience do you have?

    Have you created any floating objects?

    calm aware desire choice love express intuit move

    #12017
    Avatar of Alan
    Alan
    Participant

    Greetings Matt,

    I was fortunate enough to be able to visit both Argentina and Uruguay early this year. I liked both, but like yourself I think I would prefer Uruguay for a long term stay.

    Reading your posts, it looks like you’ve got some good ideas. Welcome.

    #12018
    Avatar of Matt
    Matt
    Participant

    @Elspru: Thanks! When I was little I was fortunate enough for my parents to briefly afford to co-own a Frers 44′ double mast, kinda like a previous version of the Swan 44 by the same artist. Mainly river crossings, which I’m not a fan of, but also some ocean-going out of Uruguay. At the same time I was always fascinated with Cruise-ships (maybe because I saw it as floating buildings with a face?) but never got into one. Then just basically sailed with whoever offered that to me in Punta del Este (Atlantic Ocean); and I now own a small sea-going, wave-breaker fiberglass Kayak.

    One of the reasons I moved (so close, it’s back and forth) to Uruguay is that I’m trying to build a pontoon out of plastic bottles and some experiments on intertidal furniture. Both would be for immediate monetization even in the smallest scale you can imagine (as a paid floating solarium with a sunshade for a beach bar). I work more formally in Real Estate in an area that’s got the ocean but also a beautiful sandspit or rather sand-barrier that dams the outflow of a small creek into a shallow lagoon. Point is that I can experiment with most levels of waves and different currents in the same place.

    Pictures will be posted when it takes some shape. If this goes well (aka doesn’t sink and is not red-taped to the seabed) I plan on building a bigger pontoon to place on Uruguayan totalitarian territorial waters to use as a restaurant. I don’t think a pontoon is the way to go for the ocean though, I like catamarans, but that’s a whole other issue. This is for my pleasure and in spirit of the incrementalism.

    @Alan, you did work in Antarctica haven’t you? While in Ushuaia I was trying to see how to hop into an icebreaker..!!

    Thanks for reading. I might be incredible naïf, uneducated, or whatever but value is there for those who can discern. As for Argentina vs Uruguay, let’s just say I am not proud of being an Argentine, but fortunately I’m not as I got an Italian Passport of utter convenience. Could have gotten an Israeli one but I’m not quiet sure I want to be a citizen of a country that demands out of its own… BS

    I love not being a citizen of the country I reside (and enjoy) the most. This reminds me: I make a point of connecting the existing expat phenomenon with the possibility of seasteading (or organizing a floating society, – legally floating that is- like gypsies – got the idea from one of Patri’s relatives, ;)

    Thanks for welcoming me!

    Matt

    #12021
    Avatar of Alan
    Alan
    Participant

    Matt wrote:
    @Alan, you did work in Antarctica haven’t you? While in Ushuaia I was trying to see how to hop into an icebreaker..!!

    Thanks for reading. I might be incredible naïf, uneducated, or whatever but value is there for those who can discern. As for Argentina vs Uruguay, let’s just say I am not proud of being an Argentine, but fortunately I’m not as I got an Italian Passport of utter convenience. Could have gotten an Israeli one but I’m not quiet sure I want to be a citizen of a country that demands out of its own… BS

    Haven’t done southern Argentina yet. Went down to Antarctica (McMurdo and Pole) by way of New Zealand. When I was finished this past time I went around the world, including Buenos Aires, Colonia and Paysandu in Uruguay, Misiones province in Argentina, and parts of Paraguay and Peru. I’d like to visit Ushuaia, other parts of Argentina, and Chile some day.

    I’ve considered a passport of convenience, but I’m not made of money. I think I read once that Peru sells citizenship for US $25,000, but even that would be a significant outlay for me – not to be taken lightly. Do you have any special insights?

    #12022
    Avatar of Matt
    Matt
    Participant

    Alan wrote:

    I’ve considered a passport of convenience, but I’m not made of money. I think I read once that Peru sells citizenship for US $25,000, but even that would be a significant outlay for me – not to be taken lightly. Do you have any special insights?

    Always glad to meet someone who’s seen the Scott-Amundsend Dome.

    I got my EU citizenship for the 400 Euro standard fee as Italy observes Ius Sanguinis nationality instead of Ius Solis. (Blood not soil). If you’ve got Italian blood and can prove it with legal, not genetic, documents, you are seen as an Italian in exile for the Racialist Italian Government. I just needed to get my hands on my great grandfather’s brith certificate and do some queues at the Consulate. and the 400€. I am less than 50% Italian and a filthy Semitic Atheist so their laws ricocheted in my case and for my fortune. Other countries include Poland, Spain…. probably most Scandinavian Kingdoms and Israel of course.

    Uruguay gives citizenship fairly quickly, after passing through residency. After the wave of (American) expats, they have expedited the process. As everywhere in LAtin America and the World, lawyers and “gifts” expedite the process even further, but Uruguay is not very corrupt in comparison.

    I don’t know about Peru, but I know someone who might (spends months a year there). What do you mean they sell citizenship? Do they cover that legally as in a huge fee or the “other way”?

    In Ecuador I’m sure you can get one “the other way” a lot faster, and cheaper, will look into that as well.

    #12080
    Avatar of Alan
    Alan
    Participant

    Thanks for the information.

    I’m afraid there won’t be any more seeing the Amundsen-Scott dome. They tore it down last season (Summer 2009-10). This season they even demolished the Old Old Station (from the 1950s) which is buried under the ice, after a tractor fell through. They decided it was just too great a hazard to leave alone. A friend of mine shot some video. Lots of explosions.

    Interesting about Italian citizenship. I’ve got no Italian ancestry – in fact, I’m mostly descended from two ethnic groups that were never even conquered by the Romans (though the Romans sure tried). It also gets a bit dicey being partly of Alsatian descent. It was in Germany when an ancestor of mine left in the 1800s, but it’s in France now. ;-)

    What I once read about Peru was that they were selling citizenship for $25,000 US. I don’t know if they’re still doing it. One nice thing about Peru is that a LOT of countries allow Peruvian citizens visa free entry. Many of the people are pretty nice, too. I enjoyed visiting Cajamarca particularly.

    One thing I found in Latin America, though: the less English a native speaks, the more honest they are. That was especially true when I visited Ecuador 11 years ago.

    I don’t know what to say about accounts of corruption. I’ve heard that Paraguay is the most corrupt country outside of Africa, yet I saw far less corruption there than in Indonesia or Thailand or the UAE. I think measurements of corruption must be very culturally biased. Likewise, when we hear via WikiLeaks lately that the Dutch company Shell essentially controls the government of Nigeria, does that corruption accrue to Nigeria or the Netherlands?

    But from what I’ve seen and heard of Latin America, Uruguay and Chile seem like the best bets. Of course, starting a new sea-going nation might be a good idea too.

    #12093
    Avatar of Matt
    Matt
    Participant

    Ave Alan, amicus germanico. Sorry to break it to you, but Alsace was very much conquered, exploited and fortified by the Romans as Germania Superior. I don’t believe you can claim Italian citizenship though, and forget about the French, they are so not-racists that they have to remind themselves of it in their laws. They’ve got ius solis. My grandma’s family is from Nevers, not far enough from the “kraut” border. ;)

    I hate, for my personal situation, to have to agree with you but this stereotype is very much true. Latin Americans that don’t speak English, or if I’m allowed to put it more bluntly, from more Native American (Bolivia) and Creolized (Ecuador, Peru, most) countries are a lot more open to foreigners in general than the Euro lebensraum that is Southern Brazil, Argentina and Uruguay. This is simply because of ethnic competition, Brazil and Argentina have received equal amounts of European immigrants than North America, and they (we?) feel Anglos are meddling out of their turf. After all most white Americans are descendants of Germans, Poles, Italians, Irish, etc, who ended up in most cases by chance in Ellis Island and not in Quebec, Santos (Sao Paulo) or the River Plate.

    Peru is the most promissing South American country after or along with Brazil. The people are indeed kind and they have something unique in the Americas: national identity not completley destroyed by the Catholic Inquisition. They know they descend from a great civilization, they have a very well put together creole way of life (kinda like Mexico without Big Brother) but they also received a LOT of Asians 100 years ago and now are part of Asean (and as you say a Peruvian can travel to most of the Pacific Rig, and farther).

    Chile, Uruguay seem like the most conventionally desirable options, but this is no way a frontier. It’s like a land reserve of the world. Not so much in Chile but in Argentina and Uruguay things move extremely slowly and are better options to deposit wealth than to create it.

    Uruguay however IS a unique very maritime country that could (I might work on that) give birth to a seastead. They are extremely sovereign, see banking laws and how it’s not in the black list for a quick example.

    Paraguay is the most capitalist, open country in South America. There is corruption by many standards, but if you (indirectly) pay for protection and know a local it’s a rather interesting place. It’s also the only country where the native language Guaraní (in Brazil Tupi) is widely spoken, official, and people have remained amazingly bilingual in two languages derived from completely different branches for 400 years.

    The good thing about gaining a Mercosur citizenship or residency is that Brazil opens up to you.

    Alan wrote:

    Thanks for the information.

    I’m afraid there won’t be any more seeing the Amundsen-Scott dome. They tore it down last season (Summer 2009-10). This season they even demolished the Old Old Station (from the 1950s) which is buried under the ice, after a tractor fell through. They decided it was just too great a hazard to leave alone. A friend of mine shot some video. Lots of explosio

    That is so depressing, I understand Bucky Fuller indirectly designed that geodesic dome. I kinda want to those videos to compensate the sadness… ;)

    #12094
    Avatar of Matt
    Matt
    Participant

    Alan wrote:
    I think measurements of corruption must be very culturally biased. Likewise, when we hear via WikiLeaks lately that the Dutch company Shell essentially controls the government of Nigeria, does that corruption accrue to Nigeria or the Netherlands?

    Both, To the nationals of both countries who had to undertake the job of and profit from from extracting oil in a place more tightly controlled by criminal gangs like say, Alberta. Even in Canada, is the oil exploitation, if not corrupt, directly accounted to the people? Who owns oil other than those who can extract it, those who live on top of it, and those who are adversely affected by its handling?

    Didn’t we always knew this since the War of Biafra? Wikileaks scandals is validating it. I strongly believe that for a new freer civ to emerge we need to reconsider all preconceptions. I guess it depends on how you define meritocracy: whether you want to conquer nature, or how to conquer men. Conversely one is to be inspired by nature, and to inspire men.

    #12149
    Avatar of Alan
    Alan
    Participant

    Matt wrote:
    Ave Alan, amicus germanico. Sorry to break it to you, but Alsace was very much conquered, exploited and fortified by the Romans as Germania Superior.

    I know, but that was only one of my ancestors – who were mostly Scots-Irish and Germans. I think. In truth, I only have a general idea where my ancestors came from, and certainly not all of them. The last one came to the United States before Ellis Island was opened, and the first one I know of came to Jamestown in 1625. (The Scots-Irish are the descendants of the Borderers who lived along the border of England and Scotland. The Scots-Irish are also the largest single ethnic group in the United States, and virtually unknown in South America.)

    Also – I can’t recall what they did with the dome. There was talk about disassembling it, and then reassembling it for a Seabees museum in California, but I’m not sure what they finally decided. But it’s not at the Pole, that’s for sure.

    BTW, I just established a Flickr account and just put up some of my photos from winter 2009.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/alan_light/

    #12154
    Avatar of Ken Sims
    Ken Sims
    Keymaster

    Alan wrote:

    BTW, I just established a Flickr account and just put up some of my photos from winter 2009.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/alan_light/

    I like that Postcard on the first page!

    #12167
    Avatar of Matt
    Matt
    Participant

    I still can’t believe my eyes on the skies of Antarctica. :)

    Proving your point I do always forget and have a fuzzy idea of what a “Scott-Irish” is, but I know they are a very popular ancestry group for Americans to identify with. In any case, it seems your blood’s been on the fair side of the Atlantic for enough centuries to consider yourself American.

    It’s sort of a paradox that I’m so interested in language and ethno-geographic groups, but so convinced of the little genetic variation among >90% of the Human Species.

    I’m very interested in human migration, dates and locations. I have a developing theory that the more a people moves the more “it” evolves. It could be said the same for an individual, but collective generalizations are much more fun and easy.

    For instance the taboo “African Question”, like the equally taboo “Jewish Question” (I am both as I’m convinced I’m a full blooded African in exile and so are you, and I’m also part Jewish) :

    If I believe the theory that only one small group made it out of Africa and to the whole world, then it would explain why that small group from which 80% of humankind descends is more advanced than those “left behind”. Likewise, the half-myth of Jewish intellectual or material wealth, Jews were not exactly nomads but were made to be, and I’m not sure why I’m using the past tense.

    This would explain why there are so many differences in culture while no relevant differences in genes, other than the quasi-extinct pockets of pure-blooded natives such as the Khoi-San or the Negrito Andaman islanders.

    Unlike Humans, dogs DO present a wide variety of genetic variation.

    #12193
    Avatar of Alan
    Alan
    Participant

    Matt wrote:

    I still can’t believe my eyes on the skies of Antarctica. :)

    Glad you liked the photos. I didn’t get any good photos of aurora, partly because 2009 was a bad year for them, partly because there are too many lights at McMurdo Station to see them well, and partly because the camera I had does not take especially good night-time pictures … but also because they don’t really look like all the photos you’ve seen, which rely on a very long exposure. Rather, at least the ones I saw were so dim that it took me a while to determine if they were real or not. I hadn’t even known that they could come in white, but I saw one and it reminded me mostly of the afterimage one gets after looking directly at a fluorescent lamp. On the other hand, the nacreous clouds are even more amazing than the photos.

    Matt wrote:

    I’m very interested in human migration, dates and locations. I have a developing theory that the more a people moves the more “it” evolves. It could be said the same for an individual, but collective generalizations are much more fun and easy.

    Well, few peoples have moved more often than the Scots-Irish but few Americans would consider the Scots-Irish especially evolved.

    Matt wrote:

    For instance the taboo “African Question”, like the equally taboo “Jewish Question” (I am both as I’m convinced I’m a full blooded African in exile and so are you

    When do we get reparations from the descendants of the Africans who kicked our ancestors out?

    #13517
    Avatar of Shoredweller
    Shoredweller
    Participant

    Matt wrote:
    Also – I can’t recall what they did with the dome. There was talk about disassembling it, and then reassembling it for a Seabees museum in California, but I’m not sure what they finally decided. But it’s not at the Pole, that’s for sure.

    According to an article in a scientific magazine:

    “…the dome is being returned to southern California where it will be held in storage. The top sections of the dome have been specially preserved so that they can be re-assembled for a possible exhibit in a new U.S. Navy Seabees museum.”

    Great pictures of yours about the “raised footprints”!

    #13626
    Avatar of Alan
    Alan
    Participant

    Shoredweller wrote:

    Matt wrote:

    Also – I can’t recall what they did with the dome. There was talk about disassembling it, and then reassembling it for a Seabees museum in California, but I’m not sure what they finally decided. But it’s not at the Pole, that’s for sure.

    According to an article in a scientific magazine:

    “…the dome is being returned to southern California where it will be held in storage. The top sections of the dome have been specially preserved so that they can be re-assembled for a possible exhibit in a new U.S. Navy Seabees museum.”

    Great pictures of yours about the “raised footprints”!

    [/quote]

    Thanks for the information. Today’s a good day – I just got word from a friend for the first time in a long time now, and she is currently the station manager at South Pole.

    I’m glad you liked the raised footprint photos – The Atlantic put together a collection of recent photos a few months back, and I was surprised to find that they had included two of mine: nacreous clouds and raised footprints.

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