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Hello Seasteaders

Home Forums Community Introductions Hello Seasteaders

This topic contains 5 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of  Anonymous 6 months, 1 week ago.

Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
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  • #22641
    Profile photo of Joshua Dix
    Joshua Dix
    Member

    Hello community,
    My name Is Joshua Dix, at present I work as a Tattoo artist in northern New York, and as a hobby I work(but do not get paid) as an industrial designer and engineer. Basically I take when my imagination comes up with and try and figure out how it would be feasible using current technology. At present I am working on a design of a spar seastead that would maintain a safe level surface during a tidal wave while still maintaining mobility. I look forward to sharing ideas with everyone here, Please comment and message me!

    #22655
    Profile photo of Ancient Man
    Ancient Man
    Member

    Welcome to TSI, Joshua!
    Feel free to share your design works!

    #22720
    Profile photo of Charlie Deist
    Charlie Deist
    Keymaster

    Hey Joshua,

    Thanks for taking the time to visit our forums. This is an interesting topic, and one into which a lot of time and energy was spent early on at the Institute. Check out the seasteading wiki: http://wiki.seasteading.org/index.php/Main_Page – specifically the sections under Structure Designs, Spar, Stability, and Low Cost Materials.

    You’re probably already on the same page as a lot of thinking – such as minimizing surface area closer to the surface, where waves will have the most force, and having a heavy ballast to lower the center of gravity. You might also want to look into Gyroscopes, space frame, and the conex dumbbell.

    I’m curious to know what you think of all of this!

    Best,
    Charlie Deist

    #22743
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    Charlie, could you run a link verifier program on this site and get rid of all the broken links?

    #23381
    Profile photo of Joshua Dix
    Joshua Dix
    Member

    Thanks for responding Charlie,
    As far as being on the same page you are correct, many of my designs include gyroscopes, isotruss, and using shipping containers though not as a permanent member of the finished platform but rather as a floating platform on which the operations of construction would take place. I must admit that many of my ideas are extremely ambitious and I am doing my best to bring these ideas down to a DIY level. I will attempt to gather my main ideas together in a cohesive post for the Engineering portion of this forum.

    #23384
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    I’d like to jump on this, with comments sure to ostracize me….

    • isotruss: what’s new? they have taken a set of normal triangle or square tower sections and overlaid them. I am not seeing how this is any stronger or cheaper than a trussed tube shape. More importantly for seasteads, i am not seeing numbers for trusses concerning wave and wind drag. That said, since i have far more time to assemble such things than i have money to buy solid structures like steel tubes, i am fond of the idea, and would like to see empirical study results. I had a picture of a conical trussed lighthouse on one of my websites, before i tore the site down over the adverse feedback i was getting. Some jack-up oil rigs use truss legs, iirc some semisubmerged oil rigs do also.
    • gyroscopes: sounds overly heavy and pricey. I am aware some cruise ships use them. Some also use heave plates, which you didn’t mention. I plan on using heave plates set into deep water.
    • shipping containers: that’s at least 1/2 ton of cramped space, and you get no inherent benefit for your money. You do not even get portablility to/from and on/off the seastead because they are monoliths that weigh so much. You can build lighter custom spaces for cheaper, with knock-down portability.
    • concrete: you didn’t mention (altho Charlie mentioned deep heavy ballast), but i make a leaping conclusion it’s in your plan. It’s in mine, as the deep weight, the cheaper construction, and for the durability factor.
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