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Ferrocement Dinghy

Home Forums Research Engineering Ferrocement Dinghy

This topic contains 81 replies, has 13 voices, and was last updated by Avatar of shredder7753 shredder7753 2 years, 6 months ago.

Viewing 7 posts - 76 through 82 (of 82 total)
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  • #15686
    Avatar of elspru
    elspru
    Participant

    I remembered some holes which were in the shade,

    went back today and fixed them up in about half an hour,

    one fairly large bow keel hole, the keelbolt bottoms had scrubbed off, and there was some abrasion on the starboard aft beam.

    I talked to some more coast people about the boat, getting more practice doing public speaking.

    calm aware desire choice love express intuit move

    #15734
    Avatar of elspru
    elspru
    Participant

    Hey, so I waited for the rain to raise the water level,

    and managed to move my boat another 200m down the river,

    there was a happy east-asian family watching me from the coast, they walked alongside.

    I made video with action shots, of actual movement, and on water views, thanks to ziplock bag waterproofing.

    here is the video of the adventure:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u7wcJYdVDmk

    So for next time, I really have to get some highly abrasion resistant outer layer,

    seems to me it’ll be the only way I’ll be able to get it down the river.

    also when the river gets deeper, it might not be as easy to do repairs.

    I’ll either have to salvage find that sheetmetal i stepped on,

    or I’ll have to get it from somewhere else.

    I really think it should be beyond my mere physical ability,

    of dragging it to hurt it, so it has to be stronger.

    There will be a whole week of sunny,

    once I’m done repairs, can work on catamaran,

    a large wooden beam drifted up to me, it’s an omen.

    calm aware desire choice love express intuit move

    #15759
    Avatar of utipia
    utipia
    Participant

    E Great advnture your on with the cement boat, one thing I’d like to remind you is that your dingy is your LIFE. When the poop hits the fan in the middle of the night your dingy is either going to kill you or save your life. While I applaud your creative venture and energy what you realy need is a Boston Whaler 11 or 13 with a Nissan electric start 10 hp motor, a computerized bilge pump, small solar panel trickle charging the AGM deep cycle battery, running lights, and don’t forget life jackets, horn, knife, flares, aux light. Your dingy is the primary life or death equipment at sea. Related info , eventually you will have the bottom covered in hugh mussels and other marine creatures which you will needto remove in order to move, every day stuff attaches to the bottom, plan on making the bottom smooth as possible and use bottom paint to reduce drag. I make my own oars out of fir, start with a 2×6 and lay out your pattern so the oars face opposite each other. cut them and shape with a sharp jack plane. Do not paint oars or varnish them they will rot in no time, just leave the wood natural, it last far longer. Please don’t go out to far in that fc dingy seems very risky. Steve

    http://www.thetipi.net

    #15768
    Avatar of elspru
    elspru
    Participant

    utipia wrote:

    E Great advnture your on with the cement boat, one thing I’d like to remind you is that your dingy is your LIFE. When the poop hits the fan in the middle of the night your dingy is either going to kill you or save your life. While I applaud your creative venture and energy

    thanks :-). I’ve repaired the dinghy, made an extensive 30minute concrete mixing documentary, featuring salmon of the on-water repair that I did.

    what you realy need is a Boston Whaler 11 or 13 with a Nissan electric start 10 hp motor, a computerized bilge pump, small solar panel trickle charging the AGM deep cycle battery, running lights,

    for a life-raft dinghy, I think that would be overkill, also a big hassel to maintain.

    and don’t forget life jackets, horn, knife, flares, aux light.

    you mean, “remember to bring”

    Your dingy is the primary life or death equipment at sea.

    so fishing gear, some basic kitchen tools and distillation/rain-catch equipment would be useful.

    However I’d say it would be the secondary, since the primary would probably be the floating drydock catmaran, which could likely be used to transport the ship, as well as go for supplies back to shore quickly. The life-raft dinghy would be used only in the case that the drydock-catamaran is away, and some catastrophic incident occurs.

    In heavy-weather the boat can descend, preferably then submerge, the catamaran could fold flat, and remain anchored to the submarine. also in such a case the anchor/tether could potentially be used to get back up to the catamaran-drydock.

    Related info , eventually you will have the bottom covered in hugh mussels and other marine creatures which you will needto remove in order to move, every day stuff attaches to the bottom, plan on making the bottom smooth as possible and use bottom paint to reduce drag.

    for the concrete, seastead, that’s part of the “hull garden”, it’s accounted for, that’s why the design is so boyant, since it’s assumed that the hull garden will weigh it down later on.

    I make my own oars out of fir, start with a 2×6 and lay out your pattern so the oars face opposite each other. cut them and shape with a sharp jack plane. Do not paint oars or varnish them they will rot in no time, just leave the wood natural, it last far longer. Please don’t go out to far in that fc dingy seems very risky. Steve

    http://www.thetipi.net

    This dinghy, is actually model size, it’s mostly for learning, concrete boat-building, engineering, design, repair, maintenance, all in a small manageable size. Once I get down to the waterfront, shall build the styrotree catamaran crane, and make one thats twice this size, which shall be big enough to use as a life-raft for 3, though it could fit 8, seated. 3.6m hull length 2.2m beam 1.4m high S-curve hull, it weighs a ton.

    An incremental size increase, and also is big enough to be a life-raft. Also I’m envisioning the possibility that people could help with construction. The construction itself could be a form of busking, in terms of we could have a bucket with some suggestive currency on shore, with a sign saying “for the boat”. project contributors, could get percentage of what the boat earns, based on their contribution. Could also run a live on water boat building workshop, though it would require lots of life jackets, and probably some waivers. While the drydock is made of floating materials, it would require people to stay on the boat. perhaps some rails or nets or fencing could help with making it more safe. construction signs could also keep out at least some intruders.

    Hmmm, thinking about it, some people might not like the sight of construction workers, projects, or fences on their trip to the beach. It’s best to start simple, and only add features as adaptations or innovations. If people remain interested, and see it as appropriate casual entertainment such as art, then it’s okay for the beach setting.

    calm aware desire choice love express intuit move

    #15780
    Avatar of utipia
    utipia
    Participant

    Elspru, Yes there is maintenance but that is a big big part of Sea Baysteading, Your dingy is your escape pod when it gets freaky on the water also your means of carrying to and fro all the stuff you need and do not need, thus the need for a motor, oars are just for backup or pulling into shallow waters. I have seen many times skiffs fill with water during heavy rain, right to the gunnels and then sink,, thus the need for batteries and pumps,your not going to like or be able to bail out a sunk skiff at 2am before you can drive it ashore in 70 mph winds with driving rain in the dark, thus the need for running lights, which if you don’t have them will garner you a 200 dollar ticket from the coast guard or worse yet you will be hit by a another boat cause they can’t see you. Whalers are THE skiff to have, there is nothing better when it comes to carrying 30 gallons of water and fuel, building materials or life or death situations, I know I can count on it every time! A used Whaler can usually be had for 500 dollars, 40 ah AGM battery, 500 mw solar panel and 300 gph bilge pump about 200 dollars, money well spent.

    http://www.thetipi.net

    #15785
    Avatar of elspru
    elspru
    Participant

    utipia wrote:

    Elspru, Yes there is maintenance but that is a big big part of Sea Baysteading, Your dingy is your escape pod when it gets freaky on the water

    “freaky on the water” is a relative term.

    Also if it’s heavy weather, I’d rather be there to help the boat if need be.

    Seasteaders, that are 200nm from shore, wont really have the option of “going ashore”,

    and would likely much rather stay in their primary boat to ride out the storm.

    also your means of carrying to and fro all the stuff you need and do not need, thus the need for a motor, oars are just for backup or pulling into shallow waters. I have seen many times skiffs fill with water during heavy rain, right to the gunnels and then sink,,

    The design of the boat life-raft is such that there is a hatch/door, and so the rain should be kept out.

    It’s quite similar in design to the ferrocement dinghy, which is also quite good at keeping out rain.

    thus the need for batteries and pumps,your not going to like or be able to bail out a sunk skiff at 2am

    okay, while I do see the benefit in an auto-bailer, manual bailers and buckets tend to be more reliable in the long-term.

    before you can drive it ashore in 70 mph winds with driving rain in the dark, thus the need for running lights, which if you don’t have them will garner you a 200 dollar ticket from the coast guard or worse yet you will be hit by a another boat cause they can’t see you.

    Oh yes, I remember now, night-lights, yes those are important.

    Whalers are THE skiff to have, there is nothing better when it comes to carrying 30 gallons of water and fuel, building materials or life or death situations, I know I can count on it every time! A used Whaler can usually be had for 500 dollars,

    0. I’m offput by the name, since I like whales.

    1. I’m unimpressed by the carrying capacity, as the life-raft I was refering to can carry a ton of stuff.

    2. Most “whaler’s” are in the $10,000 range, though I did find a bare-hull in need of repair for $700.

    3. from the looks of it, the open-top design, and low-freeboard, would make it dangerous to use in heavy weather on the ocean, a person could easily fall off the boat. Also the first major cresting wave could fill it up all the way with water, potentially washing away supplies. The bailer would be working full time, and hardly making a dent.

    4. I’ve been sailing boats for thousands of years.

    I’m still new to this whole “boats with engine’s” deal,

    since I took a 3 century break from surface humans,

    it’s unfamiliar and kinda makes me wanna puke.

    from what I’ve seen of engine’s in this lifetime,

    they are loud, they smell bad, and they are dangerous,

    when people go at such fast speeds, collisions are more damaging.

    40 ah AGM battery, 500 mw solar panel and 300 gph bilge pump about 200 dollars, money well spent.

    hmmm, that is interesting, having running lights does seem like a good idea, especially in the over-regulated western nations.

    could probably use LED lights to conserve more batteries.

    —-

    oh yes, here is my latest dinghy repair video,

    the repairs I did before hardened, so I put the boat up and bailed it out,

    seems pretty good, I did some minor repairs to the gripes,

    and I caught a healthy salmon with my hands!.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5WOQMRuqVYY

    calm aware desire choice love express intuit move

    #15791
    Avatar of shredder7753
    shredder7753
    Participant

    utipia wrote:

    …40 ah AGM battery, 500 mw solar panel and 300 gph bilge pump about 200 dollars, money well spent.

    where the HELL can i get a 500w panel for 200 bucks. i was lookin around today and they’re all about $2 per watt ($1.80/watt is findable)

    ____________

    My Work II

    “Leadership and do-ership are not the same thing”

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