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Experiment with 9-foot floating marina model

Home Forums Archive Structure Designs Experiment with 9-foot floating marina model

This topic contains 23 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by Avatar of sda1950 sda1950 4 years ago.

Viewing 9 posts - 16 through 24 (of 24 total)
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  • #2829
    Avatar of vincecate
    vincecate
    Participant

    I stapled on some foam from http://wondermat.com I had laying around to make the wood wall float higher in the water than wood normally would. I wanted them to be about half out of the water and a quick test of a section in my pool showed that 3 fully under water held the board about half out, so I did 3 on each side with them having about half in the water each.

    Yes, the bigger and deeper the wall the better. Something 3000 feet in diameter with a 200 foot wall would do really well. :-) But we have to start small…

    Ya, my latest experimental results make me think we could be fine for normal waves in the Sargasso Sea, but it would not be easy for the marina to keep boats safe in a hurricane. The water inside can still move up and down and move relative to the wall which is also going up and down. One idea is to require custom boats that can back up to the inside of the wall and attach in a secure but flexible way. But protecting boats in such a marina is not trivial in big storms. Another idea is that boats just have to leave when a hurricane is coming. For some locations this could be like once every 30 years.

    As a stable platform/foundation/flotation for a house I think it still looks really good. Imagine something looking like http://www.topsider.com/hurricane-proof-homes.asp on the top of the central column in a 112 foot diameter 1/4 acre sized one. Something this wide would be very stable. Probably it can be designed to float through a hurricane, but probably best if people got off the first few times. I think the 112 foot diameter one could be very affordable (thinking number like $150,000 or $200,000).

    I put up another picture and 2 more videos of the current model at http://www.floatingislands.com/wavebreak/ninefoot

    And a few more things at http://www.floatingislands.com/wavebreak/

    — Vince

    #2831
    Avatar of Wayne-Gramlich
    Wayne-Gramlich
    Participant

    Wave tanks are widely used by the off short structure people. I must confess that I don’t know what the scaling issues are, but they must be workable, or people would not use wave tank studies.

    I’m hoping to see the UC Berkeley Wave Tank (located in Richmond) tomorrow with Patri. I’m sure we’ll have a trip report.

    Building a model and hauling it out into the ocean may not have the same level as control as a wave tank, but is sure is a heck of a lot cheaper!

    #2838
    Avatar of thebastidge
    thebastidge
    Participant

    For a structure on top of something like this, I would definitely go with modular panels and a geodesic dome. In fact’ most structure on top of a Seastead of any type should probably be a dome, unless the function requires something different. Most resistant to high winds, structurally pretty strong if you have to mount something on top like a radio/radar mast. It’s also some of the cheapest in material construction in terms of space enclosed.

    #2914
    Avatar of vincecate
    vincecate
    Participant

    Patri called this a tension circle and I like that name. I wrote up a proposal for a Tension Circle House.

    http://wiki.seasteading.org/index.php/User:Vincecate/Tension_circle_house

    #9854
    Avatar of xiagos
    xiagos
    Participant

    How have your experiments gone since 2008?

    I like your idea, although I don’t think it goes far enough. It seems to me that you need to isolate your breakwater from the action of the waves. It may be useful to dampen the up-and-down motion of the breakwater by anchoring the break water, or by adding a floor to the model. Further, the force of the waves against the the wall of your breakwater could be somewhat deflected by angling the breakwater wall, say from 90-degrees to 45-degrees or shallower.

    As for your idea of adding living space inside the breakwater wall, I think this is a good idea too. It will add a lot of mass to counter the force of the waves.

    #9858
    Avatar of vincecate
    vincecate
    Participant

    xiagos wrote:

    How have your experiments gone since 2008?

    If you put a floor on the tension circle you are a boat at that point. It would be far more expensive to build. If you want to be in international waters, then using lines to the bottom to stop up/down motion is also really expensive.

    I have tested many other models:

    http://wiki.seasteading.org/index.php/User:Vincecate/Models

    My latest experiment and thinking:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p4icNUDqNIg

    http://wiki.seasteading.org/index.php/User:Vincecate/FloatingVilla

    – Vince

    #9997
    Avatar of sda1950
    sda1950
    Participant

    Vince,

    Have you tried making a breakwater out of cylindars laying on their sides instead of the flat walls? They might work better as they provide a slopping surface for the wave.

    Steve

    #9998
    Avatar of vincecate
    vincecate
    Participant

    sda1950 wrote:

    Have you tried making a breakwater out of cylindars laying on their sides instead of the flat walls? They might work better as they provide a slopping surface for the wave.

    You mean like this PVC model?

    http://wiki.seasteading.org/index.php/User:Vincecate/Tension_circle_house#Video_of_5-foot_PVC_model

    — Vince

    #10000
    Avatar of sda1950
    sda1950
    Participant

    Vince,

    Yes, I’ve seen that design. I was thinking more along the lines of either barrels or paint buckets connected together to form a ring. They would not move as one piece,but independently of each other. Heave plates would stop the bobbing so as not to propagate the wave.

    Steve

Viewing 9 posts - 16 through 24 (of 24 total)

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