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Business opportunity: Buy (Wil's) concrete shells, transform them into homes, and sell them to end users

Home Forums Archive Infrastructure Business opportunity: Buy (Wil's) concrete shells, transform them into homes, and sell them to end users

This topic contains 20 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of ellmer - http://yook3.com ellmer – http://yook3.com 4 years, 1 month ago.

Viewing 6 posts - 16 through 21 (of 21 total)
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  • #11881

    Ken, the one family living space bubble that can stand allone and take anything the ocean brings up on sea states, is just a thing to begin with.

    Every settlement starts with one family settling out there. The reason why families living on boats do not stay in the open ocean for extended periods of time is seasickness,and the 45 degree inclination of the toilet while sailing, all those inconvenients are gone when staying in the marina. This is why living on a relative small yacht in practice is living 99% of the time in protected marina installations.

    So to make “open ocean living” feasible a structure that gives you the calm ambient of a marina is a kind of “minimum condition”.

    If we can make a calm boat -( just a better boat) – we have done the most important step. Until now we thought that this can ONLY be achieved by big size like the cruiseship industry and oil/gas platforms handle it.

    But it can also be done by submerge (or partial submerge/deepload) a rather small structure of apartment size.

    Most persons i know would prefer a seperate living unit – that can leave the condo when wanted (loud neigbours, unbearable admin).

    A “living space bubble” does not inhibit you to socialize, it just takes the “MUST bear your neighbor” out of the equation.

    You can adopt the lonley lifestyl of captain nemo wandering allone trough the worlds oceans salvaging sunken treasures, or decide to be part of the rich social life of a caribbean marina, a waterworld seastead, asian floating markets, palm dubai, whatever you prefer, and whatever ambient you make your private living space bubble part of.

    For those of us who really like clubsteading there is no reason why you should not build a cruiseship sized living space bubble and intensly (and obligated) socialize with 3000 similar minded individuals.

    Floating structures like the Rion-Antirion Bridge Pylon, Troll, and the Ekofisk Storage Tank make it obvious that you can build (submerged, deeploaded, semisubmerged) concrete shell living space bubbles even much bigger (and of course much more economic) than cruiseships without going away from what is proven and tested engineering already.

    I do not agree with the asumption that just because the structure is (deeploaded, semi-submerged, or submergible) this has a negative impact on the social life you can develop in/on such a structure.

    A deeploaded “stadion seastead” would be the same in living and light conditions as a clubstead or a cruiseship – minus the high building cost, plus more stability, minus the elevated station keeping cost.

    When it comes to infrastructure i think we should work more towards “open infrastructure” like breakwaters, lagoon seasteads, floating marina seasteads, that allow a come together and break up of many different individual “living at sea” concepts like boats, yachts, houseboats, barges, cruiseships, not a closed unified pre designed condo city.

    Why not make “private space bubbles” and private space islands, and bring them together in a “naturally growing ambient” like palm dubai later.

    The idea that breakwater solutions do not work on open sea is wrong – the ekofisk storage tank the waterword set and many other structures, show the contrary.

    In any case there are probably multiple “seasteading cultures” different individuals will adopt, just as in land based housing which reaches from a trailer home in the desert, to living in a shared community. In general the structure does not generate the lifestyle the individual does.

    Wil

    concretesubmarine.com

    European Submarine Structures AB

    #11882
    Profile photo of OCEANOPOLIS
    OCEANOPOLIS
    Participant

    “When it comes to infrastructure i think we should work more towards “open infrastructure” like breakwaters, lagoon seasteads, floating marina seasteads, that allow a come together and break up of many different individual “living at sea” concepts like boats, yachts, houseboats, barges, cruiseships, not a closed unified pre designed condo city.”

    I couldn’t have said it better, Wil!

    In my view, the artificial floating island concept (which incorporates breakwaters, floating marinas, lagoon type seastead, etc, in one design) is the only one that so far,makes “seasteading” sense. In the order of importance: business sense, esthetical-architectural-design sense, and in general, common sense. The ability to conduct business on a seastead is of paramount importance. Without the ability to make “profit”, not for the profit’s sake, but “profit” meant as a way to achieve a high degree of self-sufficiency by engaging in various trades with the rest of the world, any seasyead will be doomed, no matter how big of a wallet that seastead was started on.

    As for “No revolutionary lifestyle changes”,…:) Steffen, you might not want to admit out loud, but your presence here @ this forum tells me that deep down inside of you there ARE revolutionary tendencies. No matter what we call it, the simple fact that you ARE considering living on a seastead is a good enough start. I don’t know much about who you are, or about how much time you spend on the water….but as a general rule, most of the people (unless a bad case of sea sickness) who didn’t, when experiencing living on the water, they will find it fascinating. I do agree that a gradual transition to a “life aquatic” should be preffered.

    #11885
    Profile photo of Ken Sims
    Ken Sims
    Keymaster
    ellmer - http://yook3.com wrote:
    Floating structures like the Rion-Antirion Bridge Pylon, Troll, and the Ekofisk Storage Tank make it obvious that you can build (submerged, deeploaded, semisubmerged) concrete shell living space bubbles even much bigger (and of course much more economic) than cruiseships without going away from what is proven and tested engineering already.

    I do not agree with the asumption that just because the structure is (deeploaded, semi-submerged, or submergible) this has a negative impact on the social life you can develop in/on such a structure.

    Let me clarify that I have nothing against the “submerged” aspect except that it seems to me that it would difficult to build such a vessel/structure that would be in the same size range as a cruise ship or clubstead.

    But I’m not an engineer and could be all wet (pun intended) in that opinion.

    As long as my infrastructure requirements are met, I’d certainly be open to a submerged or semisubmerged option.

    #11886

    Having a look at some of the structures below – you can see that the size of concrete shell structures that have been already performed sometimes exceeds widley the size of cruiseships. The only limit of size once you are building in floating status is the building budget. Any of those structures can host a community of the clubstead type.

    Rion-Antirion Pylon

    Ekofisk ring breakwater for the storage tank

    Waterworld film set in the high seas off hawaii

    a suggested “deeploaded” skyscrapper connected with other floating structures in “seastar design” – such a design can include marinas, load terminals, and expand to a seastar grid that goes for miles and creates protected water spaces.

    Existing submarine restaurant, with a big underwater area and a small surface area.

    A storage tank that could easyly serve as “stadion seastead”

    A condeep base structure

    #11887
    Profile photo of Ken Sims
    Ken Sims
    Keymaster

    Well, then, maybe someone will have a big submerged seastead in operation when about 80% of my current job goes away in about five years, and I can retire and move there!

    #11888

    Steffen wrote:

    … I plan to start close to the shore. I will do my shopping for food in ordinary shops on land. I will put the food in my freezer (produced on land), my refrigerator (produced on land) or my kitchen cabinets (probably produced on land). I will get medical care from ordinary pharmacies, hospitals and doctors on land. When I go on shore I will deliver my waste, etc. I will gradually switch to better alternatives than the existing land-based if or when such better alternatives emerge. One small lifestyle change I plan is that I will get my own electricity generation and/or electricity storage. I don’t plan to design the system myself, however. I am hoping it will be part of a package solution from my so far non-existing turnkey provider :-)

    Our approach is to supply the waterbased equivalent of “4 walls” that enclose your living space. For obvious reasons in the water you do not go “square” but round and streamlined – the fact that your living space is in the water does not change a lot compared to a living space in the suburbs or in a highrise building. Maybe you will prefer a boat as transport solution instead a car.

    You still buy your freezer in the consumer electric shop, your furniture in Ikea, – what you have to avoid is the “yacht outfitter” yacht furniture can cost 100 times more than ikea furniture but serves the same purpose. The reason why you do not see standard freezers in small yachts is that they can not work at 45degree inclination angle, the same for the toilet, the oven, standard chairs, tables, cabinets, etc…

    So the living space design needs a intrinsic “always stay on even keel” quality – or you are doomed to buy things at yacht prices for yacht living conditions. Catamarans give you that to certain extent – but semi/submerged/deeploaded hulls give you that even more.

    They literally disconnect your living space from waves and weather – what allows a standard land based outfit – at standard apartment outfitting cost, using standard outfitting professionals, (plumbers, masons, etc…) and solutions.

    They also do not require the “seamenship” as a yacht does. You do not have to trace and navigate a course to a save harbor at night – you just have to know how to close the door and go and watch your favorite TV until the storm passes.

    Producing your own comfort electricity is a great feature, it gives you independence.

    The reason why we do not turnkey outfit our hulls is that we do not want to convert our firm into a standard plumbing, masonery, electric installation firm – somebody else can do that – we want to focus on the part that nobody else can do. Really build that kind of living space bubbles at housing prices.

    In theroy a outfitter could earn 50.000 USD per cubic meter just putting furniture and freezers plumbing and cables in and still undercut existing offers – althoug i think most of the owners will prefer to save most of this money and do (or let do) the job for less than 100 USD per cubic meter.

    Wil

    concretesubmarine.com

    European Submarine Structures AB

Viewing 6 posts - 16 through 21 (of 21 total)

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