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Breakdown on construction costs for small boats?

Home Forums Archive Structure Designs Breakdown on construction costs for small boats?

This topic contains 5 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by Avatar of saumanahaii saumanahaii 5 years ago.

Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
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  • #940
    Avatar of vincecate
    vincecate
    Participant

    I think it would help with the realism of SFS if we knew the construction cost breakdowns of some sailboats, motorboats, and yachts. Things like how much money goes to kitchen stuff, how much to furniture, how much to engines, how much to electronics, to stabilizers, thrusters, structure, windows, etc. If we understood what goes into a $1 million sailboat or a $4 million yacht, we might be better able to understand the potential savings areas and what real costs are.

    I have spent some time searching for this type of information and have not found what I want.

    #6326
    Avatar of wohl1917
    wohl1917
    Participant

    http://www.macgregor26.com/ Now, a lot of ‘real sailors’ poo-poo all over the Mac but the fact is they sell, they seem to hold their value and that’s a lot more than can be said for a lot of much more expensive boats out there! That they can build and sell that boat for that price and apparently make a profit gives me hope that SFSs could be built without costing a mint!

    #6668
    Avatar of tomohern
    tomohern
    Participant

    There is a reason that “‘real sailors’ poo-poo all over the Mac”. It is because it can’t hold its own in any sort of heavy weather. It is designed to be weekend trailer sailor. The rigging is of low quality because anytime the wind picks up you are suppose to drop sail and turn on the 50hp motor and run away. Other sail boats are build heavier and tougher to withstand that heavy weather. The company makes a big deal about how they hand lay their fiberglass but that doesn’t make me any more comfortable about being out in a storm in that boat. Having been around the sailing community for 17 years I’ve heard some bad stories about those boats. I even saw one that got blown over far enough to touch the boom to the water… Luckily it was just a big gust and they popped back up but had it been a sustained wind with any sort of wave action that boat would have gone down. In comparison my 26′ sailboat never went past 45 degrees of heal that day.

    #6671
    Avatar of wohl1917
    wohl1917
    Participant

    …Since I’ve never owned a Mac or even sailed on one, this isn’t a debate I can get into. What I will say is that you might want to check out the web site and watch the video of a MacGregor 26M holding it’s own in some ‘heavy weather’ and the short 5 minute sales video. I’ve been studying these boats on-line for a long time reading the pros and frankly vicious, mean spirited cons and the worse thing that really can be said about them is that they aren’t Keel Boats. I would not claim to be an expert, but I do hold a Keel Boat Certification and have been sailing several years. For what it is, a trailerable sailboat, the Mac seems to have the competition beat. In any case the point I was making was that to build a single family seastead, profit not being a consideration would not, should not have to cost millions nor even too many hundreds of thousands of dollars.

    #6673
    Avatar of Carl-Pålsson
    Carl-Pålsson
    Participant

    They’ve apparently only sold 37,000 of them. Obviously crap. :-)

    I would guess that the biggest cost of most boats is labor. So if you design something that is really simple to build you might be able to get the cost down.

    #7100
    Avatar of saumanahaii
    saumanahaii
    Participant

    No costs, but here’s a basic parts breakdown of a 38′ sailing craft. Also offers a method to scale up same. 38′ may be a little small, and its made of wood, but hey, its a breakdown.

Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)

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