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Best shell tech yet

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This topic contains 3 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by Avatar of J.L.-Frusha J.L.-Frusha 2 years, 11 months ago.

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  • #1654
    Avatar of Morganism
    Morganism
    Participant

    Here ya go, the heck with concrete. These would have to be made on orbit, with solar ovens, and a percussive/explosive die, but that’s not to hard up there…

    Could prob bundle stacks into those movable mirror configurations from telescope design, and parachute right back down into the ocean where you wanted em.

    Delivery included in price. Rentry isn’t gonna hurt it much.

    LIVERMORE, Calif. — By combining high pressure with high temperature, Livermore researchers have created a nanocyrstalline diamond aerogel that could improve the optics for something as big as a telescope or as small as the lenses in eyeglasses.



    Aerogels are a class of materials that exhibit the lowest density, thermal conductivity, refractive index and sound velocity of any bulk solid. Aerogels are among the most versatile materials available for technical applications due to their many exceptional properties. This material has chemists, physicists, astronomers, and materials scientists utilizing its properties in myriad applications, from a water purifier for desalinizing seawater to installation on a NASA satellite as a meteorite particle collector.



    In new research appearing in the May 9 online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a Livermore team created a diamond aerogel from a standard carbon-based aerogel precursor using a laser-heated diamond anvil cell.

    A diamond anvil cell consists of two opposing diamonds with the sample compressed between them. It can compress a small piece of material (tens of micrometers or smaller) to extreme pressures, which can exceed 3 million atmospheres. The device has been used to recreate the pressure existing deep inside planets, creating materials and phases not observed under normal conditions. Since diamonds are transparent, intense laser light also can be focused onto the sample to simultaneously heat it to thousands of degrees.



    The new form of diamond has a very low density similar to that of the precursor of around 40 milligrams per cubic centimeter, which is only about 40 times denser than air.

    The diamond aerogel could have applications in antireflection coatings, a type of optical coating applied to the surface of lenses and other optical devices to reduce reflection. Less light is lost, improving the efficiency of the system. It can be applied to telescopes, binoculars, eyeglasses or any other device that may require reflection reduction. It also has potential applications in enhanced or modified biocompatibility, chemical doping, thermal conduction and electrical field emission.



    In creating diamond aergoels, lead researcher Peter Pauzauskie, a former Lawrence fellow now at the University of Washington, infused the pores of a standard, carbon-based aerogel with neon, preventing the entire aerogel from collapsing on itself.



    At that point, the team subjected the aerogel sample to tremendous pressures and temperatures (above 200,000 atmospheres and in excess of 2,240 degrees Fahrenheit), forcing the carbon atoms within to shift their arrangement and create crystalline diamonds.



    The success of this work also leads the team to speculate that additional novel forms of diamond may be obtained by exposing appropriate precursors to the right combination of high pressure and temperature.



    Livermore researchers on the project include: Jonathan Crowhurst, Marcus Worsley, Ted Laurence, Yinmin “Morris” Wang, Trevor Wiley, Kenneth Visbeck, William Evans, Joseph Zaug and Joe Satcher Jr.

    More Information

    Synthesis and characterization of a nanocyrstalline diamond aerogel

    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, May 9, 2011



    Improving Catalysis with a “Noble” Material

    Science & Technology Review, April/May 2009



    Advanced carbon aerogels for energy applications

    Newsline, March 14, 2011



    Novel Materials from Solgel Chemistry

    Science & Technology Review, May 2005


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    Only prob is diamond is an excellent thermal conductor, tho the gell will offset that somewhat, you are still going to need some insulation. More aerogel !!

    #15778
    Avatar of elspru
    elspru
    Participant

    Morganism wrote:

    Here ya go, the heck with concrete.

    many asteroids are made of rocks, and rock-metal hybrids.

    These would have to be made on orbit, with solar ovens, and a percussive/explosive die, but that’s not to hard up there…

    explosions in outer-space, hmmm, not with my oxygen…. You could do that in your space stead, though I’d like to have some shielding between you and I, perhaps a camera probe could catch the fireworks show.

    Could prob bundle stacks into those movable mirror configurations from telescope design, and parachute right back down into the ocean where you wanted em.

    Delivery included in price. Rentry isn’t gonna hurt it much.

    hmph, It seems rather silly to pay to have heavy objects thrown at one from outer space. Typically people flee when heavy debris starts falling from the sky.

    Only prob is diamond is an excellent thermal conductor, tho the gell will offset that somewhat, you are still going to need some insulation. More aerogel !!

    The low density of aerogel would make it grossly ineffective against radiation, which is the main kind of heat-transfer that goes on in space.

    Of course there is also the cost of these materials which feels like it would have to be quite enormous.

    Though ya, sure thanks for bringing it up,, I guess. Would be more interesting if you synthesized some aerogel or other substances at home, then can prove they are usable for seasteading, by making a boat out of them. :-)

    Experimentation and learning are intertwined.

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    #15779
    Avatar of Kurt
    Kurt
    Participant

    Not all Aerogels are electrical insulators. Some are thermal insulators while being electrical conductors.

    #15832
    Avatar of J.L.-Frusha
    J.L.-Frusha
    Participant

    I see a problem… Aerogels need an atmosphere to form from… thus the “aero” in the word…

    Later,

    J.L.F.

    Never be afraid to try something new…

    Remember, amateurs built the ark, professionals built the Titanic.

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