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Best intro material on ocean engineering & naval architecture?

Home Forums Archive TSI Engineering Best intro material on ocean engineering & naval architecture?

This topic contains 3 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of ellmer - http://yook3.com ellmer – http://yook3.com 4 years, 1 month ago.

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  • #1350
    Profile photo of Patri
    Patri
    Keymaster

    A friend recently asked:

    > I need to learn myself up on at least the key vocabulary and concepts of marine and ocean engineering, and therefore not sound like an idiot at my interview. Surely you’ve already been through this wringer, so I was hoping you could give me a list of your favorite books and magazines that you’ve found most helpful in getting caught up.

    Jeff Chan suggested [Construction of Marine and Offshore Structures](http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0849330521/patriscontactjug). Anyone got other ideas? Perhaps when we’re done, they can be summarized on [the wiki](http://wiki.seasteading.org/).

    #11432
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    In SNAME website there are a lot of good books: http://www.sname.org/SNAME/SNAME/Publications/Books/Default.aspx

    The basic one, almost when I was studying, was:
    Principles of Naval Architecture, Edited by Edward V. Lewis (1988)
    Here: http://www.4shared.com/get/OjX42S8m/Principles_Of_Naval_Architectu.html you can download Volume I.

    But it is too theoretical. So if you are not Naval Architect, perhaps this one could be better:
    Naval Architecture for Non-Naval Architects by Harry Benford (1991)

    Regarding OFFSHORE ENGINEERING, some of them very interesting are (the first one already suggested by Jeff Chan):

    Construction of marine and offshore structures / Gerwick, Ben C.
    Boca Raton : CRC Press, [2007]

    Design for safety of marine and offshore systems / Jin Wang, Vladimir Trbojevic
    London : IMarEST, [2007]

    Handbook of offshore engineering / edited by Subrata Chakrabarti
    Amsterdam : Elsevier, 2005

    #11433
    Profile photo of Melllvar
    Melllvar
    Participant

    There is a torrent floating around somewhere, Marine_Engineering_Ebooks or something like that (I won’t bother linking due to the legality issues). I’m not sure the quality of the material, but the price is right (free):

    This torrent Contain 15 Ebooks Of Marine Engineering
    List:
    01- BAI, Y. (2003). Marine Structural Design
    02- BERTRAM, V. (2000). Practical Ship Hydrodynamics
    03- BUTLER, D. (2000). Guide to Ship Repair Estimates – In Man-Hours
    04- DERRETT, D. R. (1999). Ship Stability for Masters and Mates (5th ed.)
    05- El-Hawary, Ferial – Ocean Engineering Handbook [CRC Press 2001]
    06- EYRES, D. J. (2001). Ship Construction (5th ed.)
    07- Hall – Principles of Naval Weapons Systems 4AH
    08- MCGEORGE, H. D. (1995). Marine Auxiliary Machinery (7th ed.)
    09- RAWSON, K. J. (2001). Basic Ship Theory (5th ed.) (2 vols.)
    10- SCHNEEKLUTH, H. (1998). Ship Design for Efficiency and Economy (2nd ed.)
    11- TAYLOR, D. A. (1996). Introduction to Marine Engineering (2nd ed.)
    12- TUPPER, E. C. (1996). Introduction to Naval Architecture (3rd ed.)
    13- WATSON, D. G. M. (1998). Practical Ship Design
    14- WOODYARD, D. F. (2004). Pounder’s Marine Diesel Engines and Gas Turbines (8th ed.)
    15- WU, Y.-S. (2001). Practical Design of Ships and Other Floating Structures (vol. 1)

    Also, this isn’t exactly what was asked for, but if interested in OTEC, “Renewable Energy from the Ocean” by William H. Avery and Chih Wu seems to be the most comprehensive book on the subject yet written. Very hard to find a copy though (I jumped through some hoops for mine, too bad our copyright laws prevent me from sharing it safely).

    #11435

    Naval architecture is an engineering discipline dealing with the design, construction and repair of marine vehicles. Happens that a seastead is absolutly not a traditional marine vehicle.

    The core of the solution which is Platform building in concrete is probably not even a footnote in most traditional Naval achitecture books.

    As mentioned in the Apply Concrete Shell Platform building – Thread only concrete has a maintenance free service life of 200 years as needed for a seastead. Ships are maintenance driven structures built in a highly maintenance dependent material (steel) dependent of a maintenance driven support industry (drydock / ship repair/ harbors) a seastead can not use this support structure due to its size.

    A seastead can not work on the same as base a ship does. The cost of having a man out on the sea in ship-like- steel structures is above USD 120/ day which is prohibitive for “large scale housing purpose”. Happens that Naval Architects are not familiar with the only engineering material that can be used to create a seastead due to their (steel oriented) engineering traditions.

    The kind of books we need to read when seasteading is the goal is “civil engineering books” which deal with concrete structures. Offshore floating concrete structures is a special segment that is somewhere halfeway between civil engineering and naval architecture.

    May i suggest the following PDF file (floating concrete structures in oil/gas industry) as a basic reading.

    http://www.tekna.no/arkiv/NB/Norwegian%20Concrete/Offshore%20Structures.pdf

    Concrete offshore reference list:

    [1] Morgan, R. G. Development of the concrete hull. “Concrete Afloat”, Proceedings of the
    conference on concrete ships and floating structures organized by The Concrete Society in
    association with the Royal Institution of Naval Architects and held in London on 3 and 4
    March, 1977.

    [2] Gloyd, C. S. Concrete Floating Bridges. Concrete International, May 1988.

    [3] Anderson, A. R. Design and Construction of a 375.000 bbl Prestressed Concrete Floating LPG
    Storage Facility for the JAVA Sea. Offshore Technology Conference, OTC 2487, 1976.

    [4] Sannum, H. Heidrun, The First Concrete TLP. The Future Development of the North Sea and
    Atlantic Frontier Regions. OCS, Aberdeen 25 and 26 January 1995.

    [5] Ruud, M. The Troll Olje Development Project. Vision Eureka, New Technology for Concrete
    Structures Offshore. Lillehammer 13 & 16 June 1994

    [6] Valenchon, Nagel, Viallon, Belbeoc’h, Rouillon: The NKOSSA concrete oil production barge.
    OMAE 1995 – Copenhagen – 14th International conference – June 18-22 1995.

    [7] Valenchon, Nagel, Viallon, Belbeoc’h, Rouillon: The NKOSSA concrete oil production barge.
    Paper presented at DOT, 30 Oct. / 1 st Nov. 1995, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    [8] Sare and Yee Operational experience with pre-stressed concrete barges “Concrete Afloat”,
    Proceedings of the conference on concrete ships and floating structures organized by The
    Concrete Society in association with the Royal Institution of Naval Architects and held in
    London on 3 and 4 March, 1977.

    [9] Fjeld (NC), Hall (Phillips), Hoff (Mobil), Michel (Doris), Robberstad (Elf), Vegge (Norw.
    Petrol. Directorate), Warland (Statoil): The North Sea concrete platforms – 20 years of
    experience, OTC 1994, Houston

    [10] Bech, S., Carlsen, J.E.: “Durability of High-Strength Offshore Concrete Structures”.
    Proceedings – 5th. International Symposium on Utilisation of High Strength/High Performance
    Concrete. Sandefjord, Norway, June 1999.

    [11] Derrington, J. A. Prestressed concrete platforms for process plants. Proceedings of the
    conference on concrete ships and floating structures organized by The Concrete Society in
    association with the Royal Institution of Naval Architects and held in London on 3 and 4
    March, 1977.

    [12] Morgan, R. G. History of and Experience with Concrete Ships. Proceedings of the conference
    on concrete ships and floating structures, Sept. 15-19, 1975 / Berkeley, California, Ben C.
    Gerwick jr. Editor.

    [13] Nanni, A. and Lista, W.L. Concrete Cracking in Coastal Areas: Problems and Solutions.
    Concrete International, Dec. 1988

    [14] FIP (Federation Internationale de la Precontrainte) state of the art report: The inspection,
    maintenance and repair of concrete sea structures, August 1982

    XIV National Conference on Structural Engineering,
    Acapulco 2004

    Offshore Structures – A new challenge

    Knut Sandvik, Rolf Eie and Jan-Diederik Advocaat,

    of Aker Kvaerner Engineering & Technology AS, Arnstein Godejord, Kåre O.Hæreid,

    Kolbjørn Høyland and Tor Ole Olsen, of Dr.techn.Olav Olsen a.s – Norway

    ——-

    Extended Reading List:

    imulead.com/tolimared/concretesubmarine/anuncios/du/

    ———

    Wil

    concretesubmarine.com

    European Submarine Structures AB

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