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Ari Takalo

Home Forums Community Introductions Ari Takalo

This topic contains 3 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by Avatar of ajtaka ajtaka 4 years, 9 months ago.

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  • #440
    Avatar of ajtaka
    ajtaka
    Participant

    I stunbled upon idea of seasteading some five years ago, followed the devolopmend since then. Looks like idea is taking some air, with funding and founding institute. glad to hear that.

    Some personal info:
    -I’am 20-years old and live in Finland. So i won’t be able to accommodate or do manual laboron first seastead.
    -Started studying Physics in finnish university last autumn majoring in Astronomy and astrobiology. So can help in that section, allso part of the reason i’am interested in seasteading. seastead is new living frontier for humans and gives some idea of spaceship like enviroment, so it is interesting area for astrobiology and space travelling. Allso one interesting thing a have thought about is using seastead as observation platform. Highseas are one of the darkest areas in world, so light waste won’t be a problem. Seasteads are larger and more stabile than boats, so it might be possible to get one stable enough to use it as an astronomical observatory. Only negative side is that you would be in sealevel, so you would not get benefit of thin atmoshphere as in mountain top observatories. so atmosphere would be dense and humid. plus side would be, that you could move it around so you could get it to good observation points.

    #1826
    Avatar of Joep
    Joep
    Participant

    Hi Ari,

    Welcome! The idea to use Seasteads to build an observatory is new I think, interesting idea. Does astrobiology include growing algae? There is some discussion on that in another topic. Any crop that would fit in a spaceship (and would not be too expensive) is perfect for Seastead as well.

    Joep

    #1898
    Avatar of ajtaka
    ajtaka
    Participant

    well astrobiology basicly studies life on other places than earth in the universe and the reguirements of life. astromer side of the job is not very much interested about practical biology. There is usually both biologist and astronomers in research team, so if we need to know about biology stuff we ask them.

    #7124
    Avatar of ajtaka
    ajtaka
    Participant

    ajtaka wrote:
    Allso one interesting thing a have thought about is using seastead as observation platform. Highseas are one of the darkest areas in world, so light waste won’t be a problem. Seasteads are larger and more stabile than boats, so it might be possible to get one stable enough to use it as an astronomical observatory. Only negative side is that you would be in sealevel, so you would not get benefit of thin atmoshphere as in mountain top observatories. so atmosphere would be dense and humid. plus side would be, that you could move it around so you could get it to good observation points.

    my studies have shown, that humidity will be large problem. so on platform observatory might be impossible, but people have experimented and used balloon telescopes. Seastead could be used as a base for a balloon telescope in the middle of the high seas. Hydrogen for the filling of the balloon would be easy to separate from sea water, but would take guite much energy. Another mighty idea (which is allready in use) and very is a profitable business is spacerocket sealaunching. allthought sealaunch company bankcrupted. offcourse this would need special seastead, which could not be used to much else. Offcourse you could have one at the edge of seacity and float it to safe distance for launch and move it back for launch preparations.

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