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Aquaculture potential in the Caribbean – breeding Mero Guasa – Rafael Vieira

Home Forums Research Business Aquaculture potential in the Caribbean – breeding Mero Guasa – Rafael Vieira

This topic contains 25 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of  Anonymous 3 years ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 26 total)
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  • #1672

    Successful Breeding of Mero Guasa en Colombia (Islas Rosario)

    Study about breeding mero guasa (here in spanish)

    #15985
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    Always good to see another species available to grow. Now we have Cobia, Pompano, and Grouper to grow in a Carribean aquaculture facility. According to the abstract, the feed onversion ratio sucks at about 9 to 1, compared to a range of about 1-2 to 1 for Pompano and Cobia, and a resistance to pelletized feed. The study used wild caught fingerlings, cites a lack of hatchery production of juvenile stock.

    #15987

    They solved the problem of hatchery of juvenile stock in the meanwhile. What impressed me most is the lack on infrastructure needed – just a very basic floating cage – that is it. I also like the possibility of selling the fish directly to the hotels. High price, local no cool chain. In a caribbean island zone it is much easier to get 50 kilo of sardines than 50 kilo of pellets.

    Local artesanal fishing practice (get 20 kilo sardines as bait in the morning with a net – fish all day – catch nothing big because the zone is overfished. – throw the sardines away and return to hungry wife and kids ) – artesanal fisherman life sucks.

    Catch sardines – bring them to the mero guasa facility get cash per kilo – you can find sardines everyday. Situating the local fisherman at the base of the foodchain instead on the top opens the way to better sustain more people with the same limited fish resources. Without requireing a change of lifestyle. Just of fishing method.

    #15988
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    Can you get local prices for the mero guasa, fingerlings, and sardines. I can modify the aquaculture business plan with the data. The two strongest immediate options I see for a seasteading business are eco tourism and aquaculture.

    As you mention, the return on investment for aquaculture is potentially huge, to where, when I created the business plan it seemed ‘too good to be true’ and I kept paring back numbers to make it much more consrvative and believable. It will take a year to start seeing positive cash flow. The eco tourism is nice in that it can produce a income immediatel to fill in the gap for the first year while the aquaculture comes on line. Another nice feature is the diversity in that food production is a recession proof industry while tourism can do well during normal economic times.

    The current business plan is here, http://seasteading.org/files/mike_doty_and_travis_canell.pdf , will modify and add another for eco tourism based on the information in these Carribean threads. We may want to develop a plan for Wil’s manufacturing of new units as well, but need to firm up a design for what will be produced, how it will be done, and associated costs. I would rather eventually cast fiber reinforced concrete, but it makes sense to start with a known method.

    #15990

    Sardines are worthless fish that can not make it to the market – they only have value as bait fish. So the best way to pin a price for sardines is to take the capacity of a canoe (100 kg load) and the labor cost of a fisherman (30.000 COP/day) – if you would place a offer for sardines of 1 canoe load of sardines for 30.000 pesos you could get pretty much any amount of fisherman working on that base and sardines in any amount you would like brought directly to your facility in canoe.

    This places a kilo sardines somewhere at 300 COP/kilo – (0,16 USD/kilo).

    The mero guasa fingerlings you can get at Rafael Vieiras facility for almost free – they produce them in mass and redistribute them to the natural environment in a eco revitalisation project.

    .

    Mero Guasa sucking in a sardine…

    What i like from mero guasa is that it is a “sturdy fish” that is disease free, tolerates water quality and temperature changes, so you can toss them out into a growth cage and never touch or manipulate the animal until it is ready for the market. So it is great aquaculture for dummies – get sardines and trow them into the cages this is pretty much all you need to do.

    It is a bit like the aquatic version of longhorn cattle and buffalo – sturdy animals that need little attention no science lab attached.

    You put a fishermans wage in to feed them – you get 10 times a fishermans wage out in high quality filet . No market fluctuation involed all works local.

    have seen your pdf – looks great!

    Wil

    #15991
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    The hurricane map provides a very strong incentive for Columbia. The water in the photos above looks very inviting. Having you on the ground there already is also an advantage. It looks good as an opportunity to launch a project there before it becomes widely known as a desirable destination.

    Like the picture of the grouper eating the sardine – that is one big mouth.

    Sounds like even at a feed conversion ratio of 9:1, 9 x .16 = $1.44 per pound of grouper feed cost, plenty of headroom to sell at $5.00 per pound in Florida if not more locally. Grouper, like pompano, is a well known food fish served in restaurants.

    The ranch idea really has me going. From the arid conditions and remote location, it seem amenable to a symbiotic relationship with the ranch, with the seastead providing desal water and energy at some point in exchange for beach access and maybe land along the beach for tourist access and maybe grow produce, crops, feed for the rancher.

    #15996
    Profile photo of Chucker
    Chucker
    Participant

    Sounds like a place a group could start things and maybe help the local economy (which would generate some support for gingos (someday I will ask what that really means not sure I want to know)). Sorry from why why up North. It Snowed today.

    This is sounding better and doable. The aquaculture start up is high mabye a scaled down version to start things?

    I am very open to ideas.

    C

    #16002
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    What does

    Normal 0

    –>

    mean?

    #16004
    Profile photo of Chucker
    Chucker
    Participant

    Normal 0

    –>

    It comes through when I post most times. Not sure why. Ken do you know?

    #16005
    Profile photo of Ken Sims
    Ken Sims
    Keymaster
    Chucker wrote:

    Normal 0

    –>

    It comes through when I post most times. Not sure why. Ken do you know?

    My guess is that you are originally writing your post in some kind of word processing program and then pasting it into the forum post, and that the copy/paste is bringing over formatting information.

    You should be able to see it in the comment box looking something like this:

    #16003
    Profile photo of elspru
    elspru
    Participant

    admiral wrote:

    The hurricane map provides a very strong incentive for Columbia. The water in the photos above looks very inviting. Having you on the ground there already is also an advantage. It looks good as an opportunity to launch a project there before it becomes widely known as a desirable destination.

    Like the picture of the grouper eating the sardine – that is one big mouth.

    Sounds like even at a feed conversion ratio of 9:1, 9 x .16 = $1.44 per pound of grouper feed cost, plenty of headroom to sell at $5.00 per pound in Florida if not more locally. Grouper, like pompano, is a well known food fish served in restaurants.

    Potentially we can improve the ratio by providing habitat for the sardines and algae,

    as has been previously mentioned in some other threads, adding nutritional iron can signficantly boost local photoplankton. We may be able to significantly boost even general fishing in the area, as the nutrients will also attract more wildlife in general. Though iron dust can be gotten in bulk from iron mills, on a small scale can get it while generate “brown gas” or hydrogen, if using iron electrodes. The calm water should maintain the nutrients added fairly close.

    So do we intend to make an enclosure for our fishing, or will the fish simply be attracted there because of the abundant food and water quality? If we have issue with beach fishermen, can simply move farther out, technically we could fish in an area surrounded by a relative nutritional void, which could act as our “invisible net”. Though perhaps in the early stages it would be a good idea to have an enclosure.

    —-

    We with You are a Network, our goal to become technologically-enabled reproducible family communities. http://weyounet.info

    #16010
    Profile photo of chadsims
    chadsims
    Participant

    If the cage is only a few meeters underwater as you say, you really wouldn’t need scooba gear. I used to be able to stay under water for two minutes. Simple practice and googles would be more than enough to do most repairs and to get down to the fish. It’s also more cost effective. In my mind I see a wide flat bottomed boat as the best choice for seasteading. It would be easy to swim under to fix because it’s width would help it to stay high in the water. The issue, if my knowlidge is right would be stability in storms for this design. Purhaps a ‘weight’ A simple weight hung off of a rope at the center of the bottom to increase stability. Or maybe one at each corner would be best? Ideas?

    ‘Lead, Follow, or get out of my way.’ -Unknown

    #16008
    Profile photo of elspru
    elspru
    Participant

    Boat Shaped Cage for Horizontally-Integrative Seasteading.

    Oh yes cages, I see it now. Perhaps we can make the “cages” from rebar and mesh, in the shape of boats or submarines, then when it’s time to harvest, can bring up the cages, get the fish, and plaster the boat. This way we integrate both the processes simultaneously. Technically making the rebar skeleton is fairly quick, then we can put an initial layer of fencing and put the fish in, while we put additional meshing, do internal components, and mesh tightening, it can stay underwater, by which time it’s possible the fish will have matured and be ready for harvest.

    This way we have the additional benefit of remaining invisible many surface-boaters and “third-party interference” throughout a significant porition of the construction process. However we would require scuba gear, though in the tropical latitudes, it should be fairly comfortable temperatures underwater, and we’re unlikely to go deeper than a few meters, so should remain quite safe. Also the scuba would be good excersize for later doing underwater maintenance, repair and substeading.

    Sure we might need to have metal and rebar which can live long underwater, such as galvinized, though we’d need that for the cage anyways, and it would be beneficial for the boat. If we found some kind of coral that can be trained to grow along mesh, we could even save on cement and plastering costs.

    Of course since it usually only takes up to a few months to do all the mesh work for an average sized boat, even if you only have one person working it, so that would imply having a fish with a relatively short life-cycle, alternatively can build several boats simultaneously, or make rather large or complex boats to take longer.

    This also allows us to keep an eye on our fish while working on the boatsdddddddddd rather tihan having our attention being divided between fish and boat.

    We with You are a Network, our goal to become technologically-enabled reproducible family communities. http://weyounet.info

    #16056
    Profile photo of xns
    xns
    Participant

    If any of you are thinking of getting involved in fish farming I’d say go for it. There’s relatively little competition and the profit margins are absolutely massive if you end up in any country that isn’t scandinavian, especially asia since we have a strange aversion to scientific methods.

    Here’s my company’s FB page: http://www.facebook.com/pages/OnHand-Agrarian/267990176567810

    And here’s a video of our farm manager feeding the fry our quarantine tanks: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=evb6g_NuFoI

    King Shannon of the Constitutional Monarchy of Logos.

    #16057
    Profile photo of xns
    xns
    Participant

    ellmer, I should point out a few errors I noticed;

    1) Grouper of any species are just as succeptable to disease as any other fish. In fact, most of our mortality is the result of common parasites like Cryptocaryon irritans, Amyloodinium ocellatum or a secondary infection arising from the parasitic infection. Using trash/bait fish compounds the problem because grouper tend to accumulate intestinal parasites and heavy metals. Though probably less of a problem where you’re from than over here.

    2) Being large predatory fish, grouper need to be sorted on a weekly basis according to their size or else they start canibalizing smaller fish. This is especially true if they associate fish with food. As a guide, my farm has survival rates in the 70% – 90% range while the industry average(Singapore) for farms that don’t do weekly sorting is 3%.

    Still, as i said before, even with 3% survival rates, it’s a profitable business if you know where and how to market your products. That fish will sell for about US$20/kg if you can get them to China or Hong Kong live.

    King Shannon of the Constitutional Monarchy of Logos.

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