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Ancient Roman Concrete

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This topic contains 4 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of Kevin Bales Kevin Bales 1 year, 4 months ago.

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  • #22083
    Profile photo of spark
    spark
    Participant

    Ancient Roman Concrete————(may ferro-cement boat using roman concrete)

     

    http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2013-06-14/ancient-roman-concrete-is-about-to-revolutionize-modern-architecture

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    Over the past decade, researchers from Italy and the U.S. have analyzed 11 harbors in the Mediterranean basin where,

    in many cases, 2,000-year-old (and sometimes older) breakwaters constructed out of Roman concrete stand perfectly

    intact despite constant pounding by the sea.

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    That’s why the findings, which were published earlier this month in the Journal of the

    American Ceramic Society and American Mineralogist, are considered so important for

    today’s industrial engineers and the future of the world’s cities and ports.

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    “The Romans made concrete by mixing lime and volcanic rock. For underwater structures, lime and volcanic

    ash were mixed to form mortar, and this mortar and volcanic tuff were packed into wooden forms. The seawater

    instantly triggered a hot chemical reaction. The lime was hydrated—incorporating water molecules into its

    structure—and reacted with the ash to cement the whole mixture together.”

     

     

     

    #22084
    Profile photo of spark
    spark
    Participant
    #22085
    Profile photo of spark
    spark
    Participant
    #22090
    Profile photo of spark
    spark
    Participant

    Mass of volcanic rocks floating off New Zealand

    August 10, 2012 – 9:39 AM

     

    http://cnsnews.com/news/article/mass-volcanic-rocks-floating-new-zealand

     
    WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) — A mass of small volcanic rocks nearly the size of Belgium has been discovered floating
    off the coast of New Zealand. – See more at:
    http://cnsnews.com/news/article/mass-volcanic-rocks-floating-new-zealand#sthash.yue00HUe.dpuf

    Where does that much volcanic rocks go???   Nearly the size of Belgium.  This could be skimmed to make ‘roman concrete’.
    Has to be crushed first.

    1,000 kilometers (620 miles) northeast of Auckland.  That is outside of New Zealand EEZ.  Who owns it?
    ISA (International Seabed Authority) might claim it, but it is not seabed because it is floating on the surface of the high seas.

    There is so much of it, that anybody can do with it whatever …

     

     

    #22215
    Profile photo of Kevin Bales
    Kevin Bales
    Participant

    Thank you spark.

    I know it happens occasionally; a chunk of rock with enough air in it to float drifts around the ocean until it gets waterlogged. Somewhere, in another thread, there was talk about simply water proofing one as-is and moving in. I like your idea better. If you put the processing equipment on the rock itself you could work from it until you had enough artificial land to move onto.

    As far as legal ownership I doubt you would get much of a fight from anyone. Most established nations have rocks. and all you have to do is tie it up in court for months (not hard to do) and work fast.

     

     

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