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Monthly Archives: January 2012

A Bold New Look for Seasteading.org

This morning, we launched our redesigned website with a bold new look to match our audacious vision, along with updated and revised content. The modern makeover fits in with our recent transition into “version 2.0” of the Institute, with our new executive staff and ambitious plans to add to the number of active seasteading business […]

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Website Migration Update – Tuesday, 24-January

The website is very close to being finalized. We have our fingers crossed that the new verion and the new forums will be live in the next few days. We are waiting on the development contractors to work out some final kinks and then perform the final migration.

We apologize that the forums have been down for the extended period, and we hope the wait for the new forums will be worthwhile for active and new users alike.

~Randy Hencken, Senior Director, The Seasteading Institute

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Registration Open for Seasteading Conference 2012!

Join us this May 31st to June 2nd for Seasteading Conference 2012 — a landmark event featuring the vanguards of the seasteading movement. Network with fellow entrepreneurs, ocean law experts, maritime professionals, industrial leaders, investors, and seasteading enthusiasts for two days of cutting-edge presentations. Enjoy catered meals and refreshments throughout the day at the luxurious […]

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Sludgesteading: Robotic Algae Farming on the High Seas

We frequently receive interesting suggestions for promising economic opportunities on the ocean, but we rarely come across an idea as novel as BEAR Oceanics’ floating robotic algae farms, which are capable of converting sludgy algae biomass into diesel biofuel. With $1,200 in materials and 140 hours of labor, the company claims it can create a […]

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Sludgesteading: Robotic Algae Farming on the High Seas

We frequently receive interesting suggestions for promising economic opportunities on the ocean, but we rarely come across an idea as novel as BEAR Oceanics’ floating robotic algae farms, which are capable of converting sludgy algae biomass into diesel biofuel. With $1,200 in materials and 140 hours of labor, the company claims it can create a robot […]

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