Wave power as disaster prevention?

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 LearnedAx writes:

Today’s (well yesterday’s, but then I got sidetracked) crazy way to save the world: place enormous arrays of windmills and wave power machines across the relatively small regions that tend to develop our major tropical storms. If the power farms are large enough, and the storm development sites can be found with enough precision, we can bleed enough energy off of developing storms to keep them from being catastrophic, while generating a lot of power off the high-activity region.

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Seasteaders at Singularity Summit

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I am at the Singularity Summit 2008, as are our Volunteer Coordinator James Hogan, Conference Coordinator Gayle Young, and a number of the seasteading08 attendees.  If you’re here, come chat with us!

 

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Discussion on seasteading challenges

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TSI Volunteer Chris Rasch, who ran the Seasteading08 conference, has some interesting discussion about common objections to seasteading on his blog.  He answer questions like "Won’t it be prohibitively expensive to live aboard a ship fulltime?", and "What about motion sickness?".

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Housing busts, household mobility, and seasteading

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From Calculated Risk:

Less worker mobility [due to negative equity] is kind of like arteriosclerosis of the economy. It lowers the overall growth potential.

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Post-conference updates: brainstorming sessions, blog posts

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I have captured the group brainstorming sessions by taking pictures of each sheet (not uploaded yet), and creating Google Docs.  Anyone is welcome to edit the doc, just comment here or email conference@seasteading.org for editing privileges:

Several attendees have blogged about the event:

If you attended and are a blogger, please blog your thoughts and impressions and give us some link love :).  (And list yourself here).

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Snippets for 10/13/2008

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Mainly last week was all about the conference, but there are a few other things…

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First Seasteading Conference – 2008

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Thanks to the 60+ people from 8+ countries who attended our conference-related events over the past few days!  It was a great turnout for our first event, and it seemed like people learned a lot and had a blast.  We’ve already started talking about doing the next conference next summer – followed by an Ephemerisle in the SF Bay for the experiental section :).

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Volunteer Page Updated!

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James Hogan, our new volunteer coordinator, reports:

Our volunteering page has been updated with a revised list of volunteer opportunities. If you’re passionate about our mission, there are lots of ways to help out! Whatever your expertise or interests, chances are very good that you can contribute. A very wide variety of skill sets are needed — legal expertise, project management, software development, publicity, the list goes on and on.

If you have any questions about volunteering, you can always contact us at volunteers@seasteading.org. Our conference this week and our upcoming monthly meetups are also great places to find out how to get plugged in.

Many of you had indicated a willingness to volunteer on our old volunteering wiki page. Thanks very much for your interest. We’ve just had a new volunteer coordinator start working with us to sort through all of the requests, and we will be getting back to all of you in the next couple of weeks.

Also, in case you missed it in the snippets, we’ve started an email list for volunteers, where we’ll send special requests and occasional notifications when the list of roles has been updated.  Sign up here.

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Snippets through 10/6/2008

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 Mainly we’ve been working on the conference, so not much else has happened in the past week.  Here are some details:

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Christiania

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Documentarist Zeina Aboul Hosn is interested in seasteading, and chronicling our social movement. On her YouTube channel you can watch a short film she made about Christiania, a semi-autonomous community in Copenhagen, which in some ways can be considered a successful micronation.

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